tremolo


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trem·o·lo

 (trĕm′ə-lō′)
n. pl. trem·o·los
1. A tremulous effect produced by rapid repetition of a single tone or by rapid alternation of two tones.
2. A device on an organ for producing a tremulous effect.
3. Vibrato, especially in singing.

[Italian, from Latin tremulus, tremulous; see tremulous.]

tremolo

(ˈtrɛməˌləʊ)
n, pl -los
1. (Music, other)
a. (in playing the violin, cello, etc) the rapid repetition of a single note produced by a quick back-and-forth movement of the bow
b. the rapid reiteration of two notes usually a third or greater interval apart (fingered tremolo). Compare trill11
2. (Music, other) (in singing) a fluctuation in pitch. Compare vibrato
3. (Music, other) a vocal ornament of late renaissance music consisting of the increasingly rapid reiteration of a single note
4. (Music, other) another word for tremulant
[C19: from Italian: quavering, from Medieval Latin tremulāre to tremble]

trem•o•lo

(ˈtrɛm əˌloʊ)

n., pl. -los.
1. a tremulous or vibrating effect produced on certain instruments and in the human voice.
2. a mechanical device in an organ by which such an effect is produced.
[1715–25; < Italian: trembling < Latin tremulus tremulous]

tremolo

rapidly repeating one note
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tremolo - (music) a tremulous effect produced by rapid repetition of a single tone or rapid alternation of two tonestremolo - (music) a tremulous effect produced by rapid repetition of a single tone or rapid alternation of two tones
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
quivering, shakiness, trembling, vibration, shaking, palpitation, quiver - a shaky motion; "the shaking of his fingers as he lit his pipe"
2.tremolo - vocal vibrato especially an excessive or poorly controlled onetremolo - vocal vibrato especially an excessive or poorly controlled one
vibrato - (music) a pulsating effect in an instrumental or vocal tone produced by slight and rapid variations in pitch
Translations

tremolo

[ˈtremələʊ] Ntrémolo m

tremolo

[ˈtrɛmələʊ] ntrémolos mpl

tremolo

n (Mus) → Tremolo nt
References in periodicals archive ?
Gino: My favorite song is 'Velcro' because of the epic intro and the tremolo guitar part.
But in doing Misirlou his way, Dale -- who died last Saturday at age 81 -- helped birth a new American sound: surf music, which with its hurtling grooves and overdriven tremolo brought listeners around the world into the psychic landscape of Dale's adopted home of Southern California.
John's Day"), intone a mournful lament ("A Mother Roasted Her Child"), conjure some frightening, nasal growls (the driving, "Walls Are Encircling the Land"), sing a hauntingly beautiful lullaby ("Luna," with its minimalist guitar tremolo accompaniment), and read a poem ("Be a String, Water, to My Guitar").
musical all vibrato doer, dirt, dire, diorite, dint, dinner, tremolo, Staccato, t.
Utah, US-based partner relationship management solution provider Impartner has acquired UK-based brand engagement software provider Tremolo Software to expand technology portfolio in channel management technology, the company said.
M2 EQUITYBITES-June 13, 2018-Impartner Acquires Tremolo Software to Expand Channel Management Technology Portfolio
(out of five) The orchestra, led by Emily Sherratt, responded well and in addition to some fine section and solo work - for example the prominent and demanding clarinet in the first half of the Stravinsky - there were some good sonorities from the strings, such as a sustained pianissimo tremolo in the later part of the work.
Alex: Hearing a cover band while on holidays do a tremolo dive.
The company believes that the VSquared Tremolo is the first onboard guitar innovation since the tremolo itself.
Whether you are a "birder" or not, it is very easy to get a sense of Doug Hill's impetus for this work from the swooping and soaring lines, to the cleverly interspersed extended techniques (stopped horn, flutter-tongue, tremolo, breath accents, vibrato, rips, falls, and glissandi), which often evoke the character of bird calls, or various other avian activity.