tremulant


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tremulant

(ˈtrɛmjʊlənt)
n
(Music, other) music
a. a device on an organ by which the wind stream is made to fluctuate in intensity producing a tremolo effect
b. a device on an electrophonic instrument designed to produce a similar effect
[C19: from Medieval Latin tremulāre to tremble]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

trem•u•lant

(ˈtrɛm yə lənt)

adj.
trembling; tremulous.
[1830–40; < Medieval Latin tremulant-, s. of tremulāns, present participle of tremulāre to tremble; see -ant]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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tremulant

adjective
Marked by or affected with tremors:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Finds included a bone disk engraved 'Tremulant', probably a gaming counter, and several moulded Ruabon style bricks which would have formed part of the detailing around windows and doors on the church.
Landels has specialized in investigating the aulos, and his presentation, which is clear and easily grasped, shows convincingly that the twin pipes, played by the same musician, were normally sounded in unison, using "a beating or tremulant effect" that "could be controlled by a skilful player, and [that] no doubt contributed to the mood or ethos of the music" (p.
But there is evidence that the convention indicated the slurred tremolo described by Stewart Carter (`The string tremolo in the 17th century', EM, xix (1991), pp.42-59), in which the strings produced an effect described by Brossard, for example, as resembling an organ tremulant. Although Carter discusses the phenomenon in a predominantly Italian context, it is frequently found in French scores, from Lully to Gluck.