trench fever


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Related to trench fever: relapsing fever

trench fever

n.
An acute infectious disease characterized by chills and fever, caused by the bacterium Bartonella quintana and transmitted by body lice.

[From its occurrence among soldiers in trenches.]

trench fever

n
(Pathology) an acute infectious disease characterized by fever and muscular aches and pains, caused by the microorganism Rickettsia quintana and transmitted by the bite of a body louse

trench′ fe`ver


n.
a recurrent fever and pain in the muscles and joints caused by a rickettsia transmitted by the body louse.
[1915–20]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trench fever - marked by pain in muscles and joints and transmitted by licetrench fever - marked by pain in muscles and joints and transmitted by lice
rickettsial disease, rickettsiosis - infectious disease caused by ticks or mites or body lice infected with rickettsial bacteria
References in periodicals archive ?
Tolkien was a combat veteran, having served in the Battle of the Somme from June 1916 until being sent back to England with trench fever in October of the same year.
He fell ill with trench fever three months later from the bites from lice that lived in the seams of his uniform and he was sent back to Britain to recover.
The human body louse (Pediculus humanus humanus) has played a key historical role in the transmission of diseases such as trench fever, epidemic typhus, and louse-borne relapsing fever (1,2).
And in 1918, the ECHO also reported the loss of Walton father-of-one Private James Milligan McCormick, KLR, who died aged 26 of trench fever after more than 12 months' service in France.
I have always been interested in the history and medicine of the First World War and I chose this subject, along with trench fever and trench nephritis, for my PhD.
Promoted to captain, Gubbins was twice wounded, first by a bullet in the neck and then in a gas attack at Arras, though it was a severe bout of trench fever that finally brought his war to an end in April 1918.
Clearly there were many soldiers who received serious injuries as a result of direct conict but trench foot and trench fever were also serious enough to result in removal from front-line service.
While he lost many of his good friends in the war, Tolkien survived as he endured a series of maladies including trench foot and trench fever which left him severely debilitated and eventually led to him being invalided out of the war in 1916.
He had volunteered to do the double watch to help a sick pal, but Frank himself was suffering from trench fever, starved of sleep and dazed by shellfire.
The story of Cyril Eliot here (based on surviving diaries and other artefacts) shows a very kind and ordinary kiwi who, though following the crowd (as well as conscription), maintains his integrity despite harsh events: from trench fever (and a stay in hospital) as well as shell shock, he experienced the good side (companionship) and the dark side.
2001: The First World War disease Trench Fever was found amongst Britain's homeless.
The human body louse, Pediculus humanus humanus, is a human parasite and is responsible for the transmission of bacteria that cause epidemic typhus, relapsing fever and trench fever.