trencher


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trench·er 1

 (trĕn′chər)
n.
1. A wooden board or platter on which food is carved or served.
2. A piece of stale bread shaped or cut to serve as a plate for eating meals in the Middle Ages.

[Middle English trenchur, from Anglo-Norman trenchour, from trencher, to cut, perhaps from Vulgar Latin *trincāre; see trench.]

trench·er 2

 (trĕn′chər)
n.
One that digs trenches.

trencher

(ˈtrɛntʃə)
n
1. (Historical Terms) (esp formerly) a wooden board on which food was served or cut
2. (Clothing & Fashion) Also called: trencher cap another name for mortarboard1
[C14 trenchour knife, plate for carving on, from Old French trencheoir, from trenchier to cut; see trench]

trencher

(ˈtrɛntʃə)
n
a person or thing that digs trenches

trench•er

(ˈtrɛn tʃər)

n.
a rectangular or circular flat piece of wood on which food is served or carved.
[1275–1325; Middle English trenchour thing to cut with or on < Anglo-French; Middle French trencheoir. See trench, -ory2]

trencher

- A platter or tray for serving food.
See also related terms for tray.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trencher - someone who digs trenchestrencher - someone who digs trenches    
digger - a laborer who digs
2.trencher - a wooden board or platter on which food is served or carvedtrencher - a wooden board or platter on which food is served or carved
board - a flat piece of material designed for a special purpose; "he nailed boards across the windows"
Translations

trencher

[ˈtrentʃəʳ] Ntajadero m

trencher

n
(Tech) → Grabenbagger m
(old: = platter) → Tran(s)chierbrett nt
References in classic literature ?
In a few moments a boy entered with a wooden trencher of poee-poee; and in regaling myself with its contents I was obliged again to submit to the officious intervention of my indefatigable servitor.
he added, as another savage appeared, bearing before him a large trencher of wood containing some kind of steaming meat, as appeared from the odours it diffused, and which he deposited at the feet of Mehevi.
Last of all came a burly islander, holding over his head a wooden trencher, in which lay disposed the remnants of our midnight feast, hidden from view, however, by a covering of bread-fruit leaves.
A region of natural curiosities The plain of white clay Hot springs The Beer Spring Departure to seek the free trappers Plain of Portneuf Lava Chasms and gullies Bannack Indians Their hunt of the buffalo Hunter's feast Trencher heroes Bullying of an absent foe The damp comrade The Indian spy Meeting with Hodgkiss His adventures Poordevil Indians Triumph of the Bannacks Blackfeet policy in war
Warming with the theme, and inflating themselves with their own eulogies, these magnanimous heroes of the trencher would start up, advance a short distance beyond the light of the fire, and apostrophize most vehemently their Blackfeet enemies, as though they had been within hearing.
Mrs Partridge, upon this, immediately fell into a fury, and discharged the trencher on which she was eating, at the head of poor Jenny, crying out, "You impudent whore, do you play tricks with my husband before my face?
I have seen him do the summerset several times together, upon a trencher fixed on a rope which is no thicker than a common pack-thread in England.
On these steps, by-the-by, I have not unfrequently seen Madame Pelet seated with a trencher on her knee, engaged in the threefold employment of eating her dinner, gossiping with her favourite servant, the housemaid, and scolding her antagonist, the cook; she never dined, and seldom indeed took any meal with her son; and as to showing her face at the boys' table, that was quite out of the question.
The wife minced a bit of meat, then crumbled some bread on a trencher, and placed it before me.
Other attendants there were of a different description; two or three large and shaggy greyhounds, such as were then employed in hunting the stag and wolf; as many slow-hounds of a large bony breed, with thick necks, large beads, and long ears; and one or two of the smaller dogs, now called terriers, which waited with impatience the arrival of the supper; but, with the sagacious knowledge of physiognomy peculiar to their race, forbore to intrude upon the moody silence of their master, apprehensive probably of a small white truncheon which lay by Cedric's trencher, for the purpose of repelling the advances of his four-legged dependants.
I had seen a sailor who had visited that very island, and he told me that it was the custom, when a great battle had been gained there, to barbecue all the slain in the yard or garden of the victor; and then, one by one, they were placed in great wooden trenchers, and garnished round like a pilau, with breadfruit and cocoanuts; and with some parsley in their mouths, were sent round with the victor's compliments to all his friends, just as though these presents were so many Christmas turkeys.
When the appetites of the whole were appeased, the squaws removed the trenchers and gourds, and the two parties began to prepare themselves for a subtle trial of their wits.