trendoid

trendoid

(ˈtrɛndɔɪd)
n
a follower of trends
adj
another word for trendy
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
I don't use a lot of trendoid abbreviations and acronyms.
The city's clubs are more up to the minute than a Greenwich clock and so slick that TV trendoid Nathan Barley would be refused entry.
By "subversive" I do not mean mindlessly subversive or "subversive" in the trendoid sense: tradition is important and must be respected.
While today's trendoid Chelsea gallery flashes and biennial-in-Bratislava agents provocateurs aren't guaranteed slots in the pantheon (i.e., MIT monographs or $750,000 reserves at the fall auctions), no artist who hasn't been either one of those things is going to get a shot.
Any trendoid wannabe will tell you that a true hipster doesn't call himself hip -- he lets others do it for him.
(The current trendoid rage for catch-and-release fishing--despite the true angler's reluctant admission, in the words of fishing writer Christopher Camuto, that the "practice smacks of bad faith, an inauthentic act"-owes much to this peculiarity.
In 1966, Carson opened for Janis Joplin, in a rock band he had formed with comedian and actor Martin Mull; in 1979, he founded "LaRocka," a New Wave modeling agency; in 1993, he became a regular contributing photographer to the trendoid "Styles of the Times" section of the New York Times.
Tempted as you are to visit big gay meccas teeming with lab types, all these trendoids will do nothing but put you to sleep.
He started the Styles of the Times section, with its features devoted to young, downtown trendoids. And he hired new staff and invested major resources in expanded coverage of the metropolitan region.