Tretis

Related to Tretis: Pacman

Tre`tis´


n.1.A treatise; also, a treaty.
a.1.Long and well-proportioned; nicely made; pretty.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dunbar's Tretis of the Tua Mariit Wemen and the Wedo is set in the context of the relatively neglected French courtly mode of satire, while a chapter on David Lyndsay offers a persuasive reassessment of the relationship between Ane Satyre of the Thrie Estaitis and French drama, and links Squyer Meldrum with the genre of chivalric biography.
The following discussion of Dunbar's Tretis of the Tua Mariit Wemen and the Wedo (a poem equally innovative in its exploration of the relationship between confession and gossip) is more laboured.
Dyvour makes its entry into Scots in line 410 of Dunbar's Tretis of the Twa Mariit Wemen and the Wedo, where the last exalts in the death of an unloved spouse:
Chapter 3 is devoted to the lesser-known William Dunbar's sixteenth-century Tretis of the Tua Mariit Wemen and the Wedo, in which a male narrator eavesdrops on the bawdy conversation of three women who are discussing their husbands' sexual inadequacies.
A concern about the danger posed by women's gossip lies at the heart of one of Dunbar's most frequently discussed works, The Tretis of the Tua Mariit Wemen and the Wedo.
Cornelius has drawn connections between Chaucer's The Wife of Bath's Prologue and the Tretis, and A.
In The Tretis, the threat that the women pose to the patriarchal hierarchy is amplified by their desirability.
The elite status of the women in The Tretis of the Tua Mariit Wemen and the Wedo is interesting for another reason as well.
On the surface, the women's conversation in The Tretis enacts misogynist fears in order to warn men to beware of all women, even the most beautiful and courtly.
MacDonald's important study of Dunbar's alliterative Tretis of Twa Mariit Wemen and the Wido, the anonymous Kynd Kittock and the history and range of Scottish alliterative verse from The Dream of the Rood onwards.
Dunbar's most celebrated and shocking satire is the alliterative Tretis of the Tua Mariit Wemen and the Wedo ("Treatise of the Two Married Women and the Widow").
treatise Middle English tretis, from Anglo-French tretiz, a derivative of Old French traitier to treat