triglyceride

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Related to triacylglycerol: Diacylglycerol, triacylglycerol lipase

tri·glyc·er·ide

 (trī-glĭs′ə-rīd′)
n.
Any of a class of compounds that consist of an ester of glycerol with three fatty acids and that are the chief constituents of fats and oils.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

triglyceride

(traɪˈɡlɪsəˌraɪd)
n
(Elements & Compounds) any ester of glycerol and one or more carboxylic acids, in which each glycerol molecule has combined with three carboxylic acid molecules. Most natural fats and oils are triglycerides
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tri•glyc•er•ide

(traɪˈglɪs əˌraɪd, -ər ɪd)

n.
an ester obtained from glycerol by the esterification of three hydroxyl groups with fatty acids, forming much of the fats and oils stored in animal and vegetable tissues. Compare glyceride.
[1855–60]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

tri·glyc·er·ide

(trī-glĭs′ə-rīd′)
A compound consisting of three fatty acids and glycerol that is the chief constituent of fats and oils.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.triglyceride - glyceride occurring naturally in animal and vegetable tissues; it consists of three individual fatty acids bound together in a single large molecule; an important energy source forming much of the fat stored by the body
fat - a soft greasy substance occurring in organic tissue and consisting of a mixture of lipids (mostly triglycerides); "pizza has too much fat"
acylglycerol, glyceride - an ester of glycerol and fatty acids that occurs naturally as fats and fatty oils; "fresh fats contain glycerides of fatty acids and very little free acid"
lipid, lipide, lipoid - an oily organic compound insoluble in water but soluble in organic solvents; essential structural component of living cells (along with proteins and carbohydrates)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

triglyceride

n triglicérido
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
By week 8, pancreatic triacylglycerol decreased from 8.0% to 1.1% (P = .03), and hepatic triacylglycerol content fell from 12.8% to 2.9% (P = .003).
The triacylglycerol constituents of fats and oils generally coexist with non-triacylglycerol components, and are represented primarily by unsaponifiable matter.
Blood levels of glucose, triacylglycerol, and cholesterol were also lower in the FR group (P<0.05) (Table 1).
Postprandial triacylglycerol metabolism is modified by the presence of genetic variation at the perilipin (PLIN) locus in 2 white populations.
Significantly, choline also improved hepatic lipid metabolism by decreasing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) generation, down-regulating the expression of lipogenic enzymes and improving fatty acid oxidation, as well as enhancing the export of triacylglycerol from the liver.
It is not correct to think that a phenotype, such as hepatic steatosis, is exclusively caused by seipin loss-of-function, without considering that patients' hepatocytes are constantly exposed to a high triacylglycerol blood content, for example.
Serum triacylglycerol was assayed by previous hydrolysis with the release of free fatty acids and glycerol, which under the action of glycerol kinase and peroxidase becomes in quinoneimine, which is directly proportional to triacylglycerol levels in the sample [31].
This result agreed with the finding of a study that reported that increasing the polyunsaturated fatty acid content in food increases the Triacylglycerol level [35, 36].
Steinberg et al., "Triacylglycerol accumulation in human obesity and type 2 diabetes is associated with increased rates of skeletal muscle fatty acid transport and increased sarcolemmal FAT/CD36," The FASEB Journal, vol.
Triacylglycerol levels varied in a nonspecific way with no significant differences between the groups.
GCs exert such an effect upon the reduction of glucose disposal and increased plasma triacylglycerol levels, which typically result from the attenuation of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscles, attenuation of insulin suppression on liver glucose output, and attenuation of insulin-suppressive action on adipose tissue lipolysis [2].