triage

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triage

sorting according to quality; the assignment of degrees of urgency to decide the order of treatment of injuries, illnesses, etc.
Not to be confused with:
triad – a group of three, as notes in a chord

tri·age

 (trē-äzh′, trē′äzh′)
n.
1. A process for sorting injured people into groups based on their need for or likely benefit from immediate medical treatment. Triage is used in hospital emergency rooms, on battlefields, and at disaster sites when limited medical resources must be allocated.
2. A system used to allocate a scarce commodity, such as food, only to those capable of deriving the greatest benefit from it.
3. A process in which things are ranked in terms of importance or priority: "For millions of Americans, each week becomes a stressful triage between work and home that leaves them feeling guilty, exhausted and angry" (Jill Smolowe).
tr.v. tri·aged, tri·ag·ing, tri·ag·es
To sort or allocate by triage: triaged the patients according to their symptoms.

[French, from trier, to sort, from Old French, to pick out; see try.]

triage

(ˈtriːˌɑːʒ; ˌtriːˈɑːʒ; ˈtraɪ-)
n
1. (Medicine) (in a hospital) the principle or practice of sorting emergency patients into categories of priority for treatment
2. (Medicine) the principle or practice of sorting casualties in battle or disaster into categories of priority for treatment
3. (Military) the principle or practice of sorting casualties in battle or disaster into categories of priority for treatment
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the principle or practice of allocating limited resources, as of food or foreign aid, on a basis of expediency rather than according to moral principles or the needs of the recipients
[C18 (in the sense: sorting (goods) according to quality): from French; see try, -age]

tri•age

(triˈɑʒ)

n., adj., v. -aged, ag•ing. n.
1. the process of sorting victims, as of a battle or disaster, to determine priority of medical treatment, with highest priority usu. given to those having the greatest likelihood of survival.
2. the determination of priorities for action in an emergency.
adj.
3. of, pertaining to, or performing the task of triage: a triage officer.
v.t.
4. to act on or in by triage: to triage a crisis.
[1925–30; < French: sorting]

triage

The evaluation and classification of casualties for purposes of treatment and evacuation. It consists of the immediate sorting of patients according to type and seriousness of injury, and likelihood of survival, and the establishment of priority for treatment and evacuation to assure medical care of the greatest benefit to the largest number.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.triage - sorting and allocating aid on the basis of need for or likely benefit from medical treatment or foodtriage - sorting and allocating aid on the basis of need for or likely benefit from medical treatment or food
sorting - grouping by class or kind or size
Translations
triagieren

triage

[ˈtriːɑːʒ] n (in hospital)triage m

tri·age

Fr. triage, clasificación y evaluación de víctimas en acontecimientos catastróficos para establecer prioridades según la urgencia del tratamiento y aumentar así el número de sobrevivientes.

triage

n triage m, evaluación f inicial de pacientes de urgencia para establecer prioridades
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients triaged were correctly referred to the clinic for surgical consultation, with a sensitivity of 95.7% (95% confidence interval, 90.8%-98.4%) and a specificity of 73.8% (95% confidence interval, 60.9%-84.2%).
Although the mean time from arrival to triage for all comers across all facilities was just under an hour, higher-acuity patients were triaged significantly faster (under or around half an hour) than lower-acuity patients (an hour or more), as shown by comparing confidence intervals.
Under-referral was investigated by quantifying hospitalizations, deaths, and more urgently triaged ED presentations in patients given low-urgency dispositions, while over-referral was examined by quantifying the least urgently triaged ED presentations in patients given dispositions to attend ED.
Levels III and IV patients were grouped together and triaged under yellow, and level V patients were triaged under green.
The pediatrician should attend the child immediately if triaged to priority red, within 10 minutes to priority orange, within 60 minutes to priority yellow, and within 120 minutes to priority green.
The numbers of patients triaged, triage accuracy, and patient satisfaction for each group are reported in [Table 4].
Patterns of telephone calls triaged by registered nurses at a urogynecology practice.
Nevertheless, triage was not always completely successful; the one health care worker who became infected with Ebola after Ring IPC activities were initiated actually sought care at his place of employment, an identified target HCF, and was permitted to enter without first being properly triaged as a probable or suspect Ebola patient.
He said: "Whenever you're performing triage, you need the people doing that triage to come back to the scene or sector commander to report their findings of how many patients they have triaged and what the categories are.
ordinarily think that these resources need to be triaged through some
The MA has now "triaged" the patient based on his/her chief complaint and using the protocols, determined the patient condition and need for care based upon a set of preapproved criteria.
A validation study of the P-SATS, conducted in 2011, included 2 014 children aged less than 13 years who were triaged at six sites in the WC.