triage

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triage

sorting according to quality; the assignment of degrees of urgency to decide the order of treatment of injuries, illnesses, etc.
Not to be confused with:
triad – a group of three, as notes in a chord

tri·age

 (trē-äzh′, trē′äzh′)
n.
1. A process for sorting injured people into groups based on their need for or likely benefit from immediate medical treatment. Triage is used in hospital emergency rooms, on battlefields, and at disaster sites when limited medical resources must be allocated.
2. A system used to allocate a scarce commodity, such as food, only to those capable of deriving the greatest benefit from it.
3. A process in which things are ranked in terms of importance or priority: "For millions of Americans, each week becomes a stressful triage between work and home that leaves them feeling guilty, exhausted and angry" (Jill Smolowe).
tr.v. tri·aged, tri·ag·ing, tri·ag·es
To sort or allocate by triage: triaged the patients according to their symptoms.

[French, from trier, to sort, from Old French, to pick out; see try.]

triage

(ˈtriːˌɑːʒ; ˌtriːˈɑːʒ; ˈtraɪ-)
n
1. (Medicine) (in a hospital) the principle or practice of sorting emergency patients into categories of priority for treatment
2. (Medicine) the principle or practice of sorting casualties in battle or disaster into categories of priority for treatment
3. (Military) the principle or practice of sorting casualties in battle or disaster into categories of priority for treatment
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the principle or practice of allocating limited resources, as of food or foreign aid, on a basis of expediency rather than according to moral principles or the needs of the recipients
[C18 (in the sense: sorting (goods) according to quality): from French; see try, -age]

tri•age

(triˈɑʒ)

n., adj., v. -aged, ag•ing. n.
1. the process of sorting victims, as of a battle or disaster, to determine priority of medical treatment, with highest priority usu. given to those having the greatest likelihood of survival.
2. the determination of priorities for action in an emergency.
adj.
3. of, pertaining to, or performing the task of triage: a triage officer.
v.t.
4. to act on or in by triage: to triage a crisis.
[1925–30; < French: sorting]

triage

The evaluation and classification of casualties for purposes of treatment and evacuation. It consists of the immediate sorting of patients according to type and seriousness of injury, and likelihood of survival, and the establishment of priority for treatment and evacuation to assure medical care of the greatest benefit to the largest number.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.triage - sorting and allocating aid on the basis of need for or likely benefit from medical treatment or foodtriage - sorting and allocating aid on the basis of need for or likely benefit from medical treatment or food
sorting - grouping by class or kind or size
Translations
triagieren

triage

[ˈtriːɑːʒ] n (in hospital)triage m

tri·age

Fr. triage, clasificación y evaluación de víctimas en acontecimientos catastróficos para establecer prioridades según la urgencia del tratamiento y aumentar así el número de sobrevivientes.

triage

n triage m, evaluación f inicial de pacientes de urgencia para establecer prioridades
References in periodicals archive ?
Se simularon las siguientes estrategias, a partir del escenario base: 1) reorganizacion del registro, que se obtiene en el modelo eliminando la etapa del registro, asi que esta labor se hace mientras los pacientes esperan el triage o la consulta; 2) implementacion del fast-track, que consiste en un proceso independiente para atender con mayor celeridad a los pacientes de los triages IV y V por un medico, de los tres disponibles para consulta prioritaria, cuya capacidad de atencion es de seis pacientes por hora; 3) se redireccionan los pacientes del triage IV y V a otro nivel del sistema; 4) aumento del numero de traslados a pisos, por ejemplo, en 10%, 30% y 50%.
Esta institucion es la que presenta mayor saturacion entre las unidades visitadas, especialmente en la etapa del triage hacia la consulta, donde se concentran en mayor proporcion los triages III, IV y V.
"Hence these triages will now be helpful to decide quickly whether they should be referred back to the health centres or otherwise."
It includes a bigger waiting area, three private triage rooms, a pharmacy and a reception and is staffed with 30 nurses and 12 doctors per shift.
Commonly referred to as "backlog reductions," or more colloquially as "service triages" the ability to step in, assess, and quickly put into place an action plan to resolve backlogs is becoming more prevalent.
There can be no doubt what the problem is, what the goal is with a clearly stated timeline, and exactly who is responsible for what, including what each manager, senior processor, technician and support person is expected to do during this triage process.
More than 11,000 Telephonic Triages have been conducted.
In 2003, using Bluegrass's emergency and assessment call center, a Telephonic Triage program was developed and piloted with five jails.
Of the 5,500 triages completed in the first year, it is estimated that they represent 7 percent of the bookings.
To the Editor: We read with interest Goldstein et al.'s [1] article, 'The accuracy of nurse performance of the triage process in a tertiary hospital emergency department in Gauteng Province, South Africa (SA)'.
An effective triage system to ensure early recognition of sick patients and prioritisation for treatment is essential.
To the Editor: We value the opportunity to reply to the letter by MacFarlane and Naidoo (1) regarding triage in South African emergency departments (EDs).