tribune


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trib·une 1

 (trĭb′yo͞on′, trĭ-byo͞on′)
n.
1. An officer of ancient Rome elected by the plebeians to protect their rights from arbitrary acts of the patrician magistrates.
2. A protector or champion of the people.

[Middle English, from Old French tribun, from Latin tribūnus, from tribus, tribe; see tribe.]

trib′u·nar′y (trĭb′yə-nĕr′ē) adj.

trib·une 2

 (trĭb′yo͞on′, trĭ-byo͞on′)
n.
1. A raised platform or dais from which a speaker addresses an assembly.
2. The usually domed or vaulted apse of a basilica.
3. See gallery.

[French, from Old French, part of a church, speaking platform, from Old Italian tribuna, from Medieval Latin tribūna, alteration of Latin tribūnal; see tribunal.]

tribune

(ˈtrɪbjuːn)
n
1. (Historical Terms) (in ancient Rome)
a. an officer elected by the plebs to protect their interests. Originally there were two of these officers but finally there were ten
b. a senior military officer
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person or institution that upholds public rights; champion
[C14: from Latin tribunus, probably from tribus tribe]
ˈtribunary adj

tribune

(ˈtrɪbjuːn)
n
1. (Architecture)
a. the apse of a Christian basilica that contains the bishop's throne
b. the throne itself
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a gallery or raised area in a church
3. rare a raised platform from which a speaker may address an audience; dais
[C17: via French from Italian tribuna, from Medieval Latin tribūna, variant of Latin tribūnal tribunal]

trib•une1

(ˈtrɪb yun, trɪˈbyun)

n.
1. a person who upholds or defends the rights of the people.
2. (in ancient Rome)
a. any of various administrative officers, esp. one of ten officers elected to protect the interests and rights of the plebeians from the patricians.
b. any of the six officers of a legion who rotated in commanding the legion during the year.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin tribūnus, derivative of tribus tribe]
trib′une•ship`, n.
trib`u•ni′tial, trib`u•ni′cial (-yəˈnɪʃ əl) adj.

trib•une2

(ˈtrɪb yun, trɪˈbyun)

n.
1. a raised platform for a speaker; a dais, rostrum, or pulpit.
2. a raised part, or gallery, with seats, as in a church.
3. the apse of a church.
[1635–45; < Medieval Latin tribūna; replacing Latin tribūnāle tribunal]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tribune - (ancient Rome) an official elected by the plebeians to protect their interests
capital of Italy, Eternal City, Italian capital, Rome, Roma - capital and largest city of Italy; on the Tiber; seat of the Roman Catholic Church; formerly the capital of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire
defender, guardian, protector, shielder - a person who cares for persons or property
antiquity - the historic period preceding the Middle Ages in Europe
2.tribune - the apse of a Christian church that contains the bishop's thronetribune - the apse of a Christian church that contains the bishop's throne
apse, apsis - a domed or vaulted recess or projection on a building especially the east end of a church; usually contains the altar
Translations

tribune

[ˈtrɪbjuːn] N
1. (= stand) → tribuna f
2. (= person) → tribuno m

tribune

1
n (Hist) → (Volks)tribun m

tribune

2
n (= platform)Tribüne f
References in classic literature ?
Titian has two Venuses in the Tribune; persons who have seen them will easily remember which one I am referring to.
Titian's Venus defiles and disgraces the Tribune, there is no softening that fact, but his "Moses" glorifies it.
I have also inserted portions of several letters written for the New York Tribune and the New York Herald.
There was, however, a little difference between the two; very different from the French tribune, whose heart was so full of hatred and ambitious vindictiveness, was the honest President, who carried in his bosom a heart as innocent as the flowers which he held in his hand.
The New World seems to have made up its mind to live in peace; and our bellicose Tribune predicts some approaching catastrophes arising out of this scandalous increase of population."
"I'm proud of helping those old fellows," he explained in 1918, and "I wish I could help more of them." See Chicago Tribune, December 6, 1918.
The legendary City News Service in Chicago where thousands of writers and journalists, including Mike Royko, Seymour Hersh and Kurt Vonnegut, got their start is closing its doors, the Chicago Tribune reported Dec.
Lipsitz and Company, a Waco, Texas, scrap dealer, is relocating to a new location in the city, according to a report in the Waco Tribune (Waco, Texas).
Carl Pon and Mike Kinson were featured in December articles in the San Gabriel Valley Daily Tribune and the Whittier Daily News ...
The pending sale of KPLR (Channel 11) to the Tribune Company raises several questions.
He recalled for the November 4th South Bend Tribune: "I stopped about 10 feet away from him and ordered him: 'Don't move.
Tribune Interactive, a subsidiary of Tribune Company announced that five of its newspaper Web sites are providing news headlines and full.