tribune

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trib·une 1

 (trĭb′yo͞on′, trĭ-byo͞on′)
n.
1. An officer of ancient Rome elected by the plebeians to protect their rights from arbitrary acts of the patrician magistrates.
2. A protector or champion of the people.

[Middle English, from Old French tribun, from Latin tribūnus, from tribus, tribe; see tribe.]

trib′u·nar′y (trĭb′yə-nĕr′ē) adj.

trib·une 2

 (trĭb′yo͞on′, trĭ-byo͞on′)
n.
1. A raised platform or dais from which a speaker addresses an assembly.
2. The usually domed or vaulted apse of a basilica.
3. See gallery.

[French, from Old French, part of a church, speaking platform, from Old Italian tribuna, from Medieval Latin tribūna, alteration of Latin tribūnal; see tribunal.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tribune

(ˈtrɪbjuːn)
n
1. (Historical Terms) (in ancient Rome)
a. an officer elected by the plebs to protect their interests. Originally there were two of these officers but finally there were ten
b. a senior military officer
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person or institution that upholds public rights; champion
[C14: from Latin tribunus, probably from tribus tribe]
ˈtribunary adj

tribune

(ˈtrɪbjuːn)
n
1. (Architecture)
a. the apse of a Christian basilica that contains the bishop's throne
b. the throne itself
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a gallery or raised area in a church
3. rare a raised platform from which a speaker may address an audience; dais
[C17: via French from Italian tribuna, from Medieval Latin tribūna, variant of Latin tribūnal tribunal]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

trib•une1

(ˈtrɪb yun, trɪˈbyun)

n.
1. a person who upholds or defends the rights of the people.
2. (in ancient Rome)
a. any of various administrative officers, esp. one of ten officers elected to protect the interests and rights of the plebeians from the patricians.
b. any of the six officers of a legion who rotated in commanding the legion during the year.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin tribūnus, derivative of tribus tribe]
trib′une•ship`, n.
trib`u•ni′tial, trib`u•ni′cial (-yəˈnɪʃ əl) adj.

trib•une2

(ˈtrɪb yun, trɪˈbyun)

n.
1. a raised platform for a speaker; a dais, rostrum, or pulpit.
2. a raised part, or gallery, with seats, as in a church.
3. the apse of a church.
[1635–45; < Medieval Latin tribūna; replacing Latin tribūnāle tribunal]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tribune - (ancient Rome) an official elected by the plebeians to protect their interests
capital of Italy, Eternal City, Italian capital, Rome, Roma - capital and largest city of Italy; on the Tiber; seat of the Roman Catholic Church; formerly the capital of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire
defender, guardian, protector, shielder - a person who cares for persons or property
antiquity - the historic period preceding the Middle Ages in Europe
2.tribune - the apse of a Christian church that contains the bishop's thronetribune - the apse of a Christian church that contains the bishop's throne
apse, apsis - a domed or vaulted recess or projection on a building especially the east end of a church; usually contains the altar
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

tribune

[ˈtrɪbjuːn] N
1. (= stand) → tribuna f
2. (= person) → tribuno m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

tribune

1
n (Hist) → (Volks)tribun m

tribune

2
n (= platform)Tribüne f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
There was a time," said the devil, as if reciting some passage from a book - "there was a time when occurred an anarchy of five years, during which the republic, bereft of all its officers, had no magistracy besides the tribunes of the people, and these were not legally vested with any degree of executive power - at that time, Monsieur Bon-Bon - at that time only I was in Rome, and I have no earthly acquaintance, consequently, with any of its philosophy."*
Critique: As thoughtful, thought-provoking, and relevant today as it was when these articles, essays, and commentaries were first produced, "Tribunes of the People and the Trade Unions" is an extraordinary volume that brings back into print perspectives on social and political issues that continue to be of value to a whole new generation of appreciative readers.
It was the historical period of the young and immature republic of Rome, which had just freed himself from the domination of the Etruscan kings and had recently suffered from the First Secession in 494 BCE-a dispute between the patrician ruling class and the plebeian underclass whose resolution led to the institution of the Tribunes of the People, magistrates who proposed legislation to the populace (or vetoed it) and provided the people with a direct representation in the senate.
It's a big smile that lifts everything up and hides the jaw that has no definition and the neck that is like a rooster's" Top fashion photographer Mario Testino "Increasingly this country is actually governed now by the bureaucrats, not the elected tribunes of the people who seem to be intimidated into submission by jobsworths" Writer Frederick Forsyth "You can see the celebrities are burnt out and tired.
We were the "tribunes of the people," and knew what was to be done.
In such a scenario, politicians will not be trusted by the people, and yet politicians will not stop claiming to be the tribunes of the people. But a great deal of cynicism will be attached to politics.