trickle-up

Related to trickle-up: Trickle down economics

trick·le-up

(trĭk′əl-ŭp′)
adj.
Of or relating to the belief that financial benefits accorded to low-income people and very small businesses, as through microcredit or governmental transfer payments, are passed on to profit wealthier people and larger businesses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Second, the tax law fails to embrace trickle-up economkf policy compatible with social justice teaching, instead relying on discredited trickle-down policy that favors the cash-rich.
Oregon has been engaged in an experiment in trickle-up economics since 2002, when voters approved an initiative that provides annual cost-of-living increases in the state's minimum wage.
Trickle-up economics promises to produce broader benefits than the other kind.
So, maybe it's time for the 99.9% of us to try a trickle-up theory by sending a message to our lawmakers regarding these recommendations.
Similarly, the colonies de vacances reflect the "trickle-up" nature of welfare development in France, "a development that has proceeded less by top-down impositions than through the central state's gradual adoption and expansion of private and local initiatives." (p.
The state gains could eventually have a trickle-up effect, forcing Congress and Bush to pay more attention to local trends toward gay rights at a time when GOP leaders are focused on energy policy, tax cuts, and other fiscal matters.
Trickle-up effect, and it 's not just Magic Johnson
There is good reason to suspect--contrary to conventional business wisdom--that trickle-up economics works better than trickle-down.
In a nice twist on trickle-down economics, we now have these bankrupt supply-siders blaming the nation's outcasts for trickle-up moral corrosion.
After 12 years of trickle-up, boom-and-bust business deals, and private profits with public costs, many affluent Americans have begun to nurse their bulimic and inexplicably hung-over inner children.