tricks


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trick

 (trĭk)
n.
1.
a. An act or procedure intended to achieve an end by deceptive or fraudulent means. See Synonyms at wile.
b. A mischievous action; a prank: likes to play tricks on the other students in the dorm.
c. A stupid, disgraceful, or childish act: Don't let the kids pull any tricks while we're gone.
2.
a. A peculiar trait or characteristic; a mannerism: "Mimicry is the trick by which a moth or other defenseless insect comes to look like a wasp" (Marston Bates).
b. A peculiar event with unexpected, often deceptive results: "One of history's cruelest tricks is to take words that sounded good at the time and make them sound pretty stupid" (David Owen).
c. A deceptive or illusive appearance; an illusion: This painting plays tricks on the eyes.
3.
a. A special skill; a knack: Is there a trick to getting this window to stay up?
b. A convention or specialized skill peculiar to a particular field of activity: learned the tricks of the winemaking trade.
4.
a. A feat of magic or legerdemain.
b. A difficult, dexterous, or clever act designed to amuse: Does your dog do any tricks?
5. Games
a. All the cards played in a single round, one from each player.
b. One such round.
6.
a. A period or turn of duty, as at the helm of a ship.
b. Slang A prison term.
7. Slang
a. An act of prostitution.
b. A prostitute's customer.
c. A session carried out by a prostitute with a client.
8. Slang A robbery or theft.
tr. & intr.v. tricked, trick·ing, tricks
To cheat or deceive or to practice trickery or deception.
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or involving tricks.
2. Capable of performing tricks: a trick dog.
3. Designed or made for doing a trick or tricks: trick cards; trick dice.
4. Weak, defective, or liable to fail: a trick knee.
Phrasal Verb:
trick out (or up) Informal
To ornament or adorn, often garishly: was all tricked out in beads and fringe.
Idioms:
do/turn the trick
To bring about the desired result.
how's tricks Informal
Used to make a friendly inquiry about a person or that person's affairs.
not miss a trick
To be extremely alert: The teacher was known for not missing a trick.

[Middle English trik, from Old North French trique, from trikier, to deceive, probably from Vulgar Latin *triccāre, from Latin trīcārī, to play tricks, from trīcae, tricks.]

trick′er n.

tricks

  • snow park - An area of a piste, or ski trail, created for snowboarders and skiers to do tricks.
  • intricate - From Latin in-, "into," and tricae, "tricks, perplexities."
  • monkeyshines - A combination of monkey and shines, "capers, tricks."
  • whist - The game was originally called whisk, from "whisking away" the cards after the tricks had been taken.
References in classic literature ?
Well, of all the mean, contemptible tricks of a human skunk this is the limit
He had fought more fights, knew how to meet more tricks and methods, and had more tricks himself, while his own method was scarcely to be improved upon.
cried Don Quixote in a loud voice; "we have no right to take vengeance for wrongs that love may do to us: remember love and war are the same thing, and as in war it is allowable and common to make use of wiles and stratagems to overcome the enemy, so in the contests and rivalries of love the tricks and devices employed to attain the desired end are justifiable, provided they be not to the discredit or dishonour of the loved object.
Taken altogether the procession was a grand success, and when it had returned to the palace the citizens crowded into the great Throne Room to see the Wizard perform his tricks.
and just you bring along your whole basket of tricks, you old son-of-a-gun.
None of the tricks that he was ever eager to do for Steward, would Michael do for Kwaque, despite the fact that Kwaque had no touch of meanness or viciousness in him.
Then he flatly told me to shut up, with my tricks of the mirrors, my springs, my revolving doors and my palaces of illusions
In tricks and skill and experience he was the master, and though he could land nothing vital, he proceeded scientifically to chop and wear down his opponent.
Things that would have made the frame of a less clever man seemed tricks in his hands.
I know all about the tricks of this road, but I have been thinking of something else and didn't realize where we were.
I feel as if he is up to some of his tricks again, and is going to try to scare me, somehow.
The Peddler saw through his trick and drove him for the third time to the coast, where he bought a cargo of sponges instead of salt.