tricolored


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tri·col·or

 (trī′kŭl′ər)
n.
1. A flag having three colors.
2. also Tricolor The French flag.
adj. also tri·col·ored (-ərd)
Having three colors.
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References in periodicals archive ?
At a bridge in Carroll County on April 27, 2018 a dead gray bat and a dead tricolored bat (Perimyotis subjlavus), both severely desiccated, were found in the same crevice as two live male gray bats.
Samsaek Gyeongdan are, therefore, tricolored rice cake balls.
Half of South Florida's original wetland areas, which covered 11,000 square miles in the early 1800s, are simply gone; the number of wading birds, including roseate spoonbills, great egrets, white ibises, tricolored herons and snowy egrets, has also dropped precipitously.
Meanwhile, citizens across the country have can be seen hoisting flags on their own accord and flying tricolored flags under a free sky.
For SS18, the low-top version has been revamped with tricolored graphics of Darth Vader, R2D2 and the Storm Trooper.
These species include the little blue heron, tricolored heron, reddish egret, roseate spoonbill, American oystercatcher, black skimmer, least tern and snowy plover (state threatened species) and the piping plover, red knot, roseate tern, and wood stork (federally-listed under the Endangered Species Act).
The researchers had examined several different kinds of bats, including little brown bats, northern long-eared bats, tricolored bats and big brown bats "to determine whether the 'wing prints' from the bundle network would satisfy the biologic measurement criteria." Those criteria for an animal biometric system dictate that the features have to be distinctive, permanent and universal, and that the system should not kill the animals or change their behavior.
It is quality marsh habitat that is rich with wildlife including roseate spoonbills, tricolored herons, great egrets, snowy egrets, white ibis, clapper rails, and others.
The tricolored bat (Perimyotis subflavus) and northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis) likely will go extinct in the state, and the little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus), the most common species in our mines and caves, probably will decline by 90% and never recover, not even in our grandchildren's lifetime.
Based upon these audio files, four bat species were identified: big brown bat (Eptesicus Jus cus), eastern red bat (Lasiurus borealis), tricolored bat (Perimyotis subflavus), and evening bat (Nycticeius humeralis).
When compared with the white Si-RES, the QE-RES stacked as a tricolored residue (three hues of brown overlaid on one another).