tricuspid valve


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tricuspid valve

n.
The three-segmented valve of the heart that keeps blood in the right ventricle from flowing back into the right atrium.

tricus′pid valve`


n.
a valve of the heart, composed of three flaps, that keeps blood from flowing backward from the right ventricle into the right atrium.
Compare mitral valve.
[1660–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tricuspid valve - valve with three cuspstricuspid valve - valve with three cusps; situated between the right atrium and the right ventricle; allows blood to pass from atrium to ventricle and closes to prevent backflow when the ventricle contracts
atrioventricular valve - either of two heart valves through which blood flows from the atria to the ventricles; prevents return of blood to the atrium
References in periodicals archive ?
[ClickPress, Mon Jun 03 2019] The tricuspid valve regulates the blood flow through the heart.
"These data are extremely encouraging, and I am excited about the potential of transcatheter tricuspid valve repair as a minimally invasive treatment option for these very ill patients who have no other options."
The procedure of separating the septal leaflet of tricuspid valve from the annulus, aiming to see the VSD better was first described by Hudspeth et al.
Transatrial and transventricular surgery was used for visualization of the VSD which was usually adequately seen through the tricuspid valve and was easier after division and resection of the obstructing muscle bundles.
Hot on the trail of aortic valve percutaneous intervention, recent percutaneous mitral and tricuspid valve intervention has yielded significant positive outcomes while filling a void in the field of heart surgery.
Ebstein anomaly (EA) is a rare cardiac congenital abnormality characterized by downward displacement of the posterior and septal leaflets of the tricuspid valve which results in atrialization of the right ventricle, enlargement of the right atrium and tricuspid regurgitation.
The most commonly involved valve was the tricuspid valve (TV) (60.1%), followed by the mitral valve (17.2%) and the aortic valve (AV) (2.9%) (Fig.
The tumour was intermittently obstructing the tricuspid valve [one of the main valves in the heart that regulates the flow of blood], which is why he was experiencing giddiness intermittently."
It is characterized by dysplastic abnormalities of tricuspid valve which involves both basal and free attachments of the tricuspid valve leaflets, with downward displacement and elongation of the septal and anterior cusp (2) resulting in tricuspid regurgitation (3), the proximal part of the right ventricle is "atrialised", becoming thin walled and poorly contractile, along with an enlarged right atrium (4).
The heart was 10 x 12 x 7 cm; the ventricles were in diastolic position, left ventricle wall 21 mm, right ventricle 4 mm thick, myocardium on cross-section was brown, with a white hard elastic focal lesion of 10 mm in diameter in the middle of the anterior wall of the left ventricle; circumference of the tricuspid valve was 13 cm, mitral valve 10 cm, pulmonary valve 8 cm, aortic valve 7 cm; the valves were anatomically correct, leaflets were elastic, without thickening.
A transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) revealed a multilobed lesion on the superior and septal leaflets of the tricuspid valve, with lesion dimension approximating 3 cm on the superior cusp.