tridarn

tridarn

(ˈtriːˌdɑːn)
n
(Furniture) Welsh a 17th-century sideboard with three levels
References in periodicals archive ?
Daeth galwad ffon i'w swyddfa ym Mae Colwyn un diwrnod gan rhywun oedd eisiau gwerthu hen gwpwrdd tridarn Cymreig.
Mae'r darnau derw yn cynnwys bwrdd, dresel, a chwpwrdd tridarn. Mae'r dyddiad 1555 ar flaen hwnnw'n gamarweiniol, oherwydd ni ddechreuwyd gwneud cypyrddau tridarn tan y 1650au.
Spoons were also sometimes displayed atop the cwpwrdd tridarn, which the glossary explains is a 'three-part press cupboard, the top part left unenclosed'.
Their development here has been linked to that of the court cupboard and the cwpwrdd deuddarn and tridarn. Court cupboards - 'court' coming from the French word for short - were cupboards designed to keep food below and sometimes display dishes above.
1 Dinky; 2 Eduardo Paolozzi (1924-2005); 3 The Mekon; 4 Shelley; 5 George Baxter (1804-1867); 6 Cwpwrdd deuddarn and cwpwrdd tridarn; 7 Stanhopes; 8 Germany; 9 Phoebe Stabler; 10 Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin (1812-1852); 11 1955; 12 William Huggins (1820-1884)
DURING a recent auction at Jones & Llewelyn Auctioneers in Llandeilo, a Tridarn (Welsh three-piece sideboard) sold for pounds 6,000.
"We are very fortunate to have a Welsh Oak Tridarn (a cupboard with a canopied upper section for display) dated 1769, in our next auction on Saturday, May 15," explains Michael Jones, owner of Jones and Llewelyn Auctioneers "Traditionally made in North Wales, this tridarn has travelled all over the UK during its long life, and has finally come back to Wales.
The study of inventories taken for probate purposes in the 17th century is another fascinating section of the volume which closes with the "golden age" and the emergence of the distinctive cwpwrdd deuddarn and cwpwrdd tridarn, precursors of the ubiquitous "Welsh dresser".
There are a number of 18th century oak coffer bachs and a superb Tridarn estimated at pounds 2500 to pounds 3000.
All over the ceiling were wreaths of wild roses, tied with fluttering green ribbons, and if she opened the bottom of the Welsh tridarn but, of course, she never would softly, softly, so as not to waken Sh--n, there might be peppermints there on a little silver dish, and in the bottom of the cupboard a slight smell of camphor.
"Sir Kyffin was aware of his heritage and obviously appreciated the simplicity of traditional Welsh furniture which can be seen in an 18th century oak Welsh dresser, estimated at pounds 3, 000-pounds 4, 000, and a late 18th century Welsh oak 'tridarn' cupboard (pounds 1,500-pounds 2,500) where he wrote his personal letters.
A set of eight Regency mahogany dining chairs should make pounds 500-pounds 700 but the late 18th-century Welsh oak tridarn with a later moulded cornice and slatted sides is more local in this Wales and West Country sale on Monday in Bonhams Bath, calling for interest of pounds 1,500-pounds 2,500.