trigonometry

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trig·o·nom·e·try

 (trĭg′ə-nŏm′ĭ-trē)
n.
The branch of mathematics that deals with the relationships between the sides and the angles of triangles and the calculations based on them, particularly the trigonometric functions.

[New Latin trigōnometria : Greek trigōnon, triangle; see trigon + Greek -metriā, -metry.]

trig′o·no·met′ric (-nə-mĕt′rĭk), trig′o·no·met′ri·cal (-rĭ-kəl) adj.
trig′o·no·met′ri·cal·ly adv.

trigonometry

(ˌtrɪɡəˈnɒmɪtrɪ)
n
(Mathematics) the branch of mathematics concerned with the properties of trigonometric functions and their application to the determination of the angles and sides of triangles. Used in surveying, navigation, etc. Abbreviation: trig
[C17: from New Latin trigōnometria from Greek trigōnon triangle]
trigonometric, ˌtrigonoˈmetrical adj
ˌtrigonoˈmetrically adv

trig•o•nom•e•try

(ˌtrɪg əˈnɒm ɪ tri)

n.
the branch of mathematics that deals with the relations between the sides and angles of plane or spherical triangles, and the calculations based on them.
[1605–15; < New Latin trigōnometria; see trigon, -o-, -metry]
trig`o•no•met′ric (-nəˈmɛ trɪk) trig`o•no•met′ri•cal, adj.
trig`o•no•met′ri•cal•ly, adv.

trig·o·nom·e·try

(trĭg′ə-nŏm′ĭ-trē)
The study of the properties and uses of trigonometric functions.

trigonometry

the branch of mathematics that treats the measurement of and relationships between the sides and angles of plane triangles and the solid figures derived from them. — trigonometric, trigonometrical, adj.
See also: Mathematics
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trigonometry - the mathematics of triangles and trigonometric functionstrigonometry - the mathematics of triangles and trigonometric functions
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
pure mathematics - the branches of mathematics that study and develop the principles of mathematics for their own sake rather than for their immediate usefulness
spherical trigonometry - (mathematics) the trigonometry of spherical triangles
triangulation - a trigonometric method of determining the position of a fixed point from the angles to it from two fixed points a known distance apart; useful in navigation
Translations
trigonometrie
trigonometria
trigonometri

trigonometry

[ˌtrɪgəˈnɒmɪtrɪ] Ntrigonometría f

trigonometry

[ˌtrɪgəˈnɒmətri] ntrigonométrie f

trigonometry

trigonometry

[ˌtrɪgəˈnɒmɪtrɪ] ntrigonometria
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1819, it was noted how he walked 586 miles in 22 days during his surveying work and, the following year, he was appointed by the Duke of Wellington as superintendent of the trigonometrical survey.
It took him from Feldkirch and Zurich, where he went to school with Conrad Gessner, to the Universities of Wittenberg and Leipzig, and onward to Prague, Krakow and Kaschau/Kosice, where the noted composer of trigonometrical tables spent part of his final years carving out a second career as a physician with strong Paracelsian inclinations.
2] = 4[pi]/24 are fixed coefficients of trigonometrical expansion which guarantees the 24 h periodicity of the function F.
The Himalaya has always been a region of myth and cosmological creation for the Indian subcontinent, an other-worldly abode of the gods, but at the same time an actual mountain range mapped by the Great Trigonometrical Survey in the 19th century, and the living place of richly varied communities.
Through the courtesy of the Director of the SA Trigonometrical Survey Office (Mr Boonzeier) sixteen concrete pillars were constructed by the Trig Surveyor Beacon Building section along the line for the mounting of the telescopes.
Cesar Francois Cassini de Thury born; a French astronomer, grandson of Jean-Dominique Cassini; appointed Director of the Paris Observatory in 1771; undertook and completed a trigonometrical survey of France.
Everest was named in 1852 by the colonial-era Great Trigonometrical Survey of India which singled out the until then unremarkable peak in the eastern Himalayas as the tallest mountain in the world.
2), obtained through a simple trigonometrical relation (see Fig.
The Froudean mechanic," which McEntegart drolly characterizes as "diplomacy by trigonometrical tables," is still alive and well (8, 2).
Ingham, Some trigonometrical inequalities with applications to the theory of series, Math.
He "formulated the trigonometrical ratios essentially as we use them today.