trilateration


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trilateration

(ˌtraɪlætəˈreɪʃən)
n
(Surveying) a method of surveying in which a whole area is divided into triangles, the sides of which are measured, usually by electromagnetic distance measuring for geodetic control or by chain survey for a detailed survey
References in periodicals archive ?
Marron, "COLA: Complexity-reduced trilateration approach for 3D localization in wireless sensor networks," in Proc.
Text messages are coded as numerals using the ASCII character set, algorithms are used in encryption and apps while GPS technology relies on trilateration calculations.
The system uses a process called trilateration to pinpoint one's position.
The use of GPS technology to get the location of every node will consume a big amount of energy; it's possible to use trilateration and triangulation techniques [28, 29, 30] to determine the coordinates of every sensor node in the network.
Current trends in OpNav are based on trilateration (where timing of the transmitted signal is known a priori) and triangulation (where the antenna system's orientation is known a priori).
As pointed in [16], there are three kinds of RSS-based positioning: trilateration, approximate or similarity perception, and scene analysis.
For the purpose of privacy protection, the results returned by most NS app servers only contain essential user information u and coarse-grained distances l, because if the accurate distances are provided, a user's exact location can be calculated by trilateration position methods easily [8].
They basically work like a collection of satellites with which we leverage trilateration to determine the position of a smartphone.
The most basic algorithm used for positioning based on range estimation is trilateration [6].
Dilution of precision (DOP) measures are calculated from the geometry of the satellites used to determine a position fix and were developed as a measure of positional accuracy based on trilateration, the process of determining absolute or relative locations of points using distances and geometry of hyperbolas (Langley 1999).
The majority of localization algorithms assume a dense network trilateration or multilateration can be organized.
The location is detected using the principle of trilateration [28].