tripey

tripey

(ˈtraɪpɪ)
adj
characteristic of tripe; worthless
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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crackers CLASSY J For total luxury, it has to be these sophisticated, gold glitter connoisseur crackers, PS25 for six, from Marks & Spencer CHILLERS 3 Go for an icy mid-winter look with these navy blue and white crackers, PS10 for six, Sainsbury's S J TRIPEY These pretty, striped crackers are PS6.88 for six at Tesco SHINING A LIGHT AT THE TABLE CANDLES can be dangerous on the dinner table with everyone pulling crackers, but they look so pretty.
Philip Larkin had his first job at the public library here, handing out, as he cheerfully put it, "tripey novels to morons".
The usual tripey mix of recordings and trash sports nobody's interested in except the participants.
Since 1916 when George "Tripey" Hayes and his wife Lilian moved to Coventry from Manchester and began selling tripe to workmates, the name Hayes has been synonymous with tripe in Coventry.
Originally "Tripey" used to have the offal brought to the city on the Manchester train but demand was so great that he leased a shop in Market Street and later a factory in Rowley's Green.
Rueful though he may have been in 1943 about having to earn his living by "handing out tripey novels to morons," he did not see this, in itself, as a threat to his poetry.
If you didn't spot it from the general level of the vocabulary in the narrative, the tripey music they felt they had to play between scenes was the giveaway.