triple bond

(redirected from triple bonds)
Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia.

triple bond

n.
A covalent bond in which three electron pairs are shared between two atoms.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

triple bond

n
(Chemistry) a type of chemical bond consisting of three distinct covalent bonds linking two atoms in a molecule
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tri′ple bond′



n. Chem.
a chemical linkage consisting of three covalent bonds between two atoms of a molecule, represented in chemical formulas by three lines or six dots, as CH≡CH or CH⋮⋮CH.
[1885–90]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Carbon does not start out with a solution; instead, it approaches the question, "What is carbon?" with a lengthy description of its unique chemical properties that make it possible to have so many different structures, allowing for long, complex chains and rings with single, double, and triple bonds. Ervine's narrative is of transformation and the miracle of life; however, she points out that the same element, carbon, that is a building block of life, is, when misused, the vector of extermination of life on earth.
In virtual reality, AR VR Molecules Editor allows organic and inorganic molecular structures to be built with single, double and triple bonds, as well as cyclic compounds.
Besides making up 78 percent of the air we breathe, nitrogen atoms can form stable triple bonds with one another, making N7 one of the most stable of molecules.
Thus, during the initial analysis of the structure of radicals it is possible to identify a certain relationship between the efficiency of incorporating nucleotides with modified bases and characteristics of the modifications, such as the length of a strand of a radical and position of triple bond. In that case, the position of triple bonds could play a key role in the process of recognition of nucleotides by DNA polymerases.
Beside, 1,4-dihydroxy-2-butyne (BOZ) (shown in Figure 3) contains hydroxyl groups and p-electron in triple bonds, which makes it is suitable used as a corrosion inhibitor in many conditions.
Several other studies (9-13) confirm that the carbon-carbon triple bonds are consumed with reaction progress and have monitored extent of reaction via FTIR measurements.