triple-expansion


Also found in: Wikipedia.

tri′ple-expan′sion



adj.
noting a power source, esp. a steam engine, using the same fluid at three successive stages of expansion to do work in three or more cylinders.
[1880–85]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The jewel in the crown is undoubtedly the gargantuan Marshall 'inverted vertical' triple-expansion steam pump that dominates the main exhibition space (right).
A new Skinner Uniflow steam engine replaced her original triple-expansion, up-and-down power plant, and new boilers were installed in 1950--the equivalent of a mid-life facelift.
They had big sturdy, triple-expansion (reciprocating) engines, could beat 16 knots and had "nowt to go wrong."
Both the Lucania and Campania had the largest triple-expansion engines fitted on Cunard ships.
Its centrepiece artifact would be a donated triple-expansion steam engine taken from a former Mackinaw Straits car ferry.
His team, he added, would like to build a version with a triple-expansion engine featuring reheat that would run at a more efficient 420 pounds per square inch.
There are also many other models, including an 1887 triple-expansion engine used by small merchant vessels.
The new vessel was propelled by three triple-expansion engines for greater efficiency, and held an impressive load of 26 railroad cars.
The 2,500-ton Isle of Man ferry was built in 1897 and was powered by mighty triple-expansion engines.
On the third weekend of each month, the triple-expansion steam engine is fired up and the galley stove stoked, giving you a real sense of the ship under power.
There are also many other models on display, including an 1887 triple-expansion engine used by small merchant vessels.
Completed in 1928, the Worthington Simpson triple-expansion engines were at the centre of the Kempton Park water treatment works in Middlesex, which during in its heyday in the 1960s employed 144 people and delivered 86 million gallons of water a day.