tripod


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tri·pod

 (trī′pŏd′)
n.
1. A three-legged object, such as a cauldron, stool, or table.
2. An adjustable three-legged stand, as for supporting a transit or camera.

[Latin tripūs, tripod-, from Greek tripous, three-footed : tri-, tri- + pous, foot; see -pod.]

trip′o·dal (trĭp′ə-dl, trī′pŏd′l) adj.

tripod

(ˈtraɪpɒd)
n
1. (Photography) an adjustable and usually collapsible three-legged stand to which a camera, etc, can be attached to hold it steady
2. (Furniture) a stand or table having three legs
[C17: via Latin from Greek tripod-, tripous three-footed, from tri- + pous foot]
tripodal adj

tri•pod

(ˈtraɪ pɒd)

n.
1. a three-legged stand or support, as for a camera or telescope.
2. a stool, table, pedestal, etc., with three legs.
[1595–1605; < Latin tripod-, s. of tripūs < Greek trípous, s. tripod orig., three-footed. See tri-, -pod]
trip•o•dal (ˈtrɪp ə dl, ˈtraɪ pɒd l) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tripod - a three-legged rack used for supporttripod - a three-legged rack used for support
camera tripod - a tripod used to support a camera
easel - an upright tripod for displaying something (usually an artist's canvas)
leg - one of the supports for a piece of furniture
rack, stand - a support for displaying various articles; "the newspapers were arranged on a rack"
Translations
مِنْصَب ثُلاثي القَوائِم
stativ
fotóállvány
òrífótur
trikojis
trijkājis
statív
üç ayaklı sehpa

tripod

[ˈtraɪpɒd] Ntrípode m

tripod

[ˈtraɪpɒd] ntrépied m

tripod

n (Phot) → Stativ nt; (Hist) → Dreifuß m

tripod

[ˈtraɪpɒd] ntreppiede m

tripod

(ˈtraipod) noun
a stand with three legs, especially for a camera.
References in classic literature ?
Peering in, we could see that the only light in the room came from a dull blue flame which flickered from a small brass tripod in the centre.
He caught up his camera tripod which was near his cot, and made a swing with it at the creature that had flown into the tent through an opening it had made for itself.
Hamel held the telescope to his eye and steadied it upon the little tripod stand.
And over bones and logs of immolated men and gods they bore him, past the horrors of other immolated ones that yet lived, to the three-king- post tripod and the huge king-post striker.
And there was set out for them within the course a great tripod of gold, the splendid work of cunning Hephaestus.
A monstrous tripod, higher than many houses, striding over the young pine trees, and smashing them aside in its career; a walking engine of glittering metal, striding now across the heather; articulate ropes of steel dangling from it, and the clattering tumult of its passage mingling with the riot of the thunder.
But in the corridors that followed the suite, there stood, opposite to each window, a heavy tripod, bearing a brazier of fire, that projected its rays through the tinted glass and so glaringly illumined the room.
How could one look at Ahab then, seated on that tripod of bones, without bethinking him of the royalty it symbolized?
Then Arete told her maids to set a large tripod upon the fire as fast as they could, whereon they set a tripod full of bath water on to a clear fire; they threw on sticks to make it blaze, and the water became hot as the flame played about the belly of the tripod.
Gringoire, who liked noble and classical comparisons, compared him in thought to the living tripod of Vulcan.
Cattle and sheep are to be had for harrying, and a man buy both tripods and horses if he wants them, but when his life has once left him it can neither be bought nor harried back again.
Thus property is as an instrument to living; an estate is a multitude of instruments; so a slave is an animated instrument, but every one that can minister of himself is more valuable than any other instrument; for if every instrument, at command, or from a preconception of its master's will, could accomplish its work (as the story goes of the statues of Daedalus; or what the poet tells us of the tripods of Vulcan, "that they moved of their own accord into the assembly of the gods "), the shuttle would then weave, and the lyre play of itself; nor would the architect want servants, or the [1254a] master slaves.