trippingly


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trip·ping

 (trĭp′ĭng)
adj.
1. Moving quickly and lightly; nimble.
2. Speaking or flowing easily; fluent.

trip′ping·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.trippingly - moving with quick light stepstrippingly - moving with quick light steps; "she walked lightsomely down the long staircase"
Translations

trippingly

adv walktrippelnd; grand phrases roll trippingly off his tongueihm kommen große Worte über die Lippen
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
His youthful back appeared to the best advantage; his active little legs took him away trippingly in the direction of the village.
He danced like a faun; he introduced manner and style and atmosphere; his words came trippingly upon his tongue, and--he waltzed twice in succession with the paper- box girl that Dempsey Donovan brought.
already it falleth trippingly from my tongue, and forasmuch as --"
After a time they delivered their message, and the speech of Menelaus ran trippingly on the tongue; he did not say much, for he was a man of few words, but he spoke very clearly and to the point, though he was the younger man of the two; Ulysses, on the other hand, when he rose to speak, was at first silent and kept his eyes fixed upon the ground.
Irus was very angry and answered, "You filthy glutton, you run on trippingly like an old fish-fag.
Apollo et Hyacinthus (note the Latin, all trippingly sung by the soloists, and helpfully surtitled), Mozart's first opera - though really it's an intermedium split between the acts of a moralistic play - again suffered in comparison with what we knew the composer was to achieve a little later on in his tragically short life, but Page presided over an exemplary performance.
As Hamlet says to the players 'Speak the speech I pray you as I pronounced it to you, trippingly upon the tongue'.
Danc-/Ing" is set trippingly over the line ending there, as the line's pulses are set racing by a "beauty" whose "Dangerous" allure the staccato rhythms of the rest of the poem attempt to hold at arm's length: "own, / Home at heart, heaven's sweet gift; | then leave, let that alone" (ll.
Here he keeps the action moving nimbly and trippingly and keeps the ensemble of mostly student actors in perfect tune with each other.