tripudium

tripudium

(traɪˈpjuːdɪəm)
n, pl -ia (-ɪə)
(Dancing) an ancient religious dance
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
On the basis of a comparison with the joyful tripudium of the Beauvais Ludus Danielis, Fassler arrives at the same conclusion with respect to the lively staging of this scene': 'While they sing, it may be assumed that the other members of the king's court behave in Babylonian mode'; see 'The Feast of Fools and Ludus Danielis', 88, n 82.
(32) Although Jerome uses the word tripudium just once in his translation of the Bible, with reference to the rejoicing of the Jews (Esther 8.16), he uses it regularly in his scriptural commentaries to refer to those who dance (saltantes) with physical energy or to general exultation.
(37) Ambrose similarly employs tripudium and the related verb tripudiare (from which derives the English verb, to trip in the sense of dance) in commentary on Luke 7:32: "There is indeed a certain proper clapping of good actions and deeds, whose sound goes out into the world and results in the glory of good deeds, there is honest leaping by which the spirit dances, and the body rises with good works, when we hang our instruments on the willows." (38) Ambrose regularly contrasts indecent dancing with the morally correct use of the body when approaching baptism.
(41) Augustine uses saltatio in a consistently pejorative sense as concerning worldly dancing, and tripudium only when referring to Julian of Eclanum "dancing over" a particular issue.
(58) Yet Honorius never describes any tripudium or chorea as part of the liturgy of the Christian community.
Although Beleth is not clear about this wheel, he does refer to a kind of tripudium, presumably performed by people dancing in a wheel.
He does not mention the tripudium that involved torchlight processions around the fields.
In this version, he modifies his explanation of the tripudium involving a turning wheel by developing a parallel between the conception of Christ and John the Baptist and the spring and autumn equinoxes.
Stephen, the first deacon, after Christmas Day vespers, and do the readings of the night office and blessings after the Gospel (which they would not normally do), while priests performed the tripudium similarly on the vespers of the feast itself, in honor of St.
(115) Traditionally the dance or tripudium was restricted to men, and involved a row of dancers making three steps forward and one back (or sometimes five forward and two back), and then processing to behind the main altar, where a metal corona, carrying images of the apostles, was lowered over the dancers.