trisyllable

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tri·syl·la·ble

 (trī′sĭl′ə-bəl)
n.
A three-syllable word.

tri′syl·lab′ic (-sĭ-lăb′ĭk), tri′syl·lab′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
tri′syl·lab′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

trisyllable

(traɪˈsɪləbəl)
n
(Grammar) a word of three syllables
trisyllabic, ˌtrisylˈlabical adj
ˌtrisylˈlabically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tri•syl•la•ble

(ˈtraɪˌsɪl ə bəl, traɪˈsɪl-)

n.
a word or metrical unit of three syllables.
[1580–90; < Greek trisýllabos; see tri-, syllable]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trisyllable - a word having three syllables
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

trisyllable

[ˈtraɪˈsɪləbl] Ntrisílabo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

trisyllable

ndreisilbiges Wort
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

trisyllable

[ˌtraɪˈsɪləbl] ntrisillabo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
In the three cases, half of the stimuli have short extension (monosyllables and disyllables) and the other half have long extension (trisyllables and polysyllables).
If we exclude articles, prepositions and conjunctions, out of a total of 25 words we have 13 polysyllabic words: 6 trisyllables, 5 quadrisyllables and even 2 pentasyllables.
Target lexemes were nouns, 41 disyllables and 5 trisyllables, in two forms: the nominative and the illative (in some cases illative/partitive).
Considering the class of body terms, we find the more general or semantically "unmarked" words, such as inataq 'eye,' kami 'hand,' tulaakng 'bone,' or kelingaq 'ear,' tending to simple disyllabism (or trisyllables), while semantically marked words, such as kelebamaakng 'scapula, shoulder blade,' kelepisikng 'temples, ' kereranum 'amniotic fluids, waters, ' or kerepuruq 'skullcap,' are quadrisyllable words containing the prefix *kali-.
The piano introduction, with its weak-strong-weak triplet patterns, mirrors the trisyllables of the predominantly anapestic meter of the poem.
Citing Paul Fussell on the nineteenth-century replacement of strict accentual-syllabic prosody with an accentualism that permitted trisyllables within predominantly duple patterns, Dransfield argues that the meters of Maud are literally lawless (excepting the strict accentual-syllabic lines elicited by Maud's military ballad) and thus directly convey the sensory experience of morbidity.
Adult performance in a sound substitution game was sensitive to onset-rime structure within the stressed medial syllable of trisyllables and in the final syllable of disyllables.
The identical behavior of prefixed and suffixed trisyllables thus supports the bracketing-independent constraint, the morpheme-to-stress principle.
While the long vowels and diphthongs triggering lengthening in disyllables and many of the trisyllabic cases are either etymologically long (as in the case of many diphthongs) or have arisen through intervocalic consonant loss, many cases of lengthening in trisyllables have been triggered by spontaneous lengthening of the second vowel, e.g.