trite


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trite

 (trīt)
adj. trit·er, trit·est
Not evoking interest because of overuse or repetition; hackneyed.

[Latin trītus, from past participle of terere, to wear out; see terə- in Indo-European roots.]

trite′ly adv.
trite′ness n.

trite

(traɪt)
adj
1. hackneyed; dull: a trite comment.
2. archaic frayed or worn out
[C16: from Latin trītus worn down, from terere to rub]
ˈtritely adv
ˈtriteness n

trite

(traɪt)

adj. trit•er, trit•est.
1. lacking in freshness or effectiveness because of constant use or excessive repetition; hackneyed.
2. characterized by hackneyed expressions, ideas, etc.
[1540–50; < Latin trītus worn, common, past participle of terere to rub, wear down]
trite′ly, adv.
trite′ness, n.
syn: See commonplace.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.trite - repeated too often; overfamiliar through overuse; "bromidic sermons"; "his remarks were trite and commonplace"; "hackneyed phrases"; "a stock answer"; "repeating threadbare jokes"; "parroting some timeworn axiom"; "the trite metaphor `hard as nails'"
unoriginal - not original; not being or productive of something fresh and unusual; "the manuscript contained unoriginal emendations"; "his life had been unoriginal, conforming completely to the given pattern"- Gwethalyn Graham

trite

trite

adjective
Translations
تافِه، مُبْتَذَل
otřelý
klichéagtig
banáliselcsépeltelkoptatott
útslitinn, margtugginn
banaliaibanalumas
banālsnodrāzts
banálny
basma kalıpbayat

trite

[traɪt] ADJtrillado, manido

trite

[ˈtraɪt] adjbanal(e)

trite

adj (+er) (= trivial, banal)banal, nichtssagend; (= hackneyed)abgedroschen; it would be trite to say that …es wäre banal zu sagen, dass …

trite

[traɪt] adj (remark) → banale; (story, idea) → trito/a e ritrito/a

trite

(trait) adjective
(of a remark, saying etc) already said in exactly the same way so often that it no longer has any worth, effectiveness etc. His poetry is full of trite descriptions of nature.
ˈtritely adverb
ˈtriteness noun
References in classic literature ?
In the old trite saying that love is a projection of self--an egoisme a deux--lies a profound meaning known only to philosopher and poet; for it is ourself in truth that we love in that other.
(here a general depression set in all round), pursuits which, pursuits which;--then let us ever remember what was said by the Spartan General, in words too trite for repetition, at the battle it were superfluous to specify.
Love at first sight is a trite expression quite sufficiently discussed; enough that in certain smouldering natures like this man's, that passion leaps into a blaze, and makes such head as fire does in a rage of wind, when other passions, but for its mastery, could be held in chains.
A trite platitude about his not caring to lose her was on his lips, but he refrained from uttering it.
Such experience, to him (to use a trite simile), will be like the storm to the oak, which, though it may scatter the leaves, and snap the smaller branches, serves but to rivet the roots, and to harden and condense the fibres of the tree.
"I will not weary you," he said, "with the usual trite remarks.
"Take your pens and commence writing," said I, in as dry and trite a voice as if I had been addressing only Jules Vanderkelkov and Co.
All those minute circumstances belonging to private life and domestic character, all that gives verisimilitude to a narrative, and individuality to the persons introduced, is still known and remembered in Scotland; whereas in England, civilisation has been so long complete, that our ideas of our ancestors are only to be gleaned from musty records and chronicles, the authors of which seem perversely to have conspired to suppress in their narratives all interesting details, in order to find room for flowers of monkish eloquence, or trite reflections upon morals.
The rest took place with the trite rapidity of the equatorial latitudes.
For though every good author will confine himself within the bounds of probability, it is by no means necessary that his characters, or his incidents, should be trite, common, or vulgar; such as happen in every street, or in every house, or which may be met with in the home articles of a newspaper.
But though he had a fine flux of words, and delivered his little voice with great pomposity and pleasure to himself, and never advanced any sentiment or opinion which was not perfectly trite and stale, and supported by a Latin quotation; yet he failed somehow, in spite of a mediocrity which ought to have insured any man a success.
And do not let any one impugn this statement with the trite proverb that "He who builds on the people, builds on the mud," for this is true when a private citizen makes a foundation there, and persuades himself that the people will free him when he is oppressed by his enemies or by the magistrates; wherein he would find himself very often deceived, as happened to the Gracchi in Rome and to Messer Giorgio Scali[+] in Florence.