trochee

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Related to trochees: Dactyls, spondees

tro·chee

 (trō′kē)
n.
1. A metrical foot consisting of a stressed syllable followed by an unstressed syllable, as in season.
2. A metrical foot in quantitative verse consisting of a long syllable followed by a short one.

[French trochée, from Latin trochaeus, from Greek trokhaios, from trokhos, a running, from trekhein, to run.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

trochee

(ˈtrəʊkiː)
n
(Poetry) prosody a metrical foot of two syllables, the first long and the second short (¯˘). Compare iamb
[C16: via Latin from Greek trokhaios pous, literally: a running foot, from trekhein to run]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tro•chee

(ˈtroʊ ki)

n.
a foot of two syllables, a long followed by a short in quantitative meter, or a stressed followed by an unstressed in accentual meter.
[1580–90; < Latin trochaeus < Greek (poùs) trochaîos running (foot), akin to trochós wheel, tréchein to run]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

trochee

a foot of two syllables, the first long or stressed, the second short or unstressed. — trochaic, adj.
See also: Verse
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

trochee

A metrical foot of two syllables, the first accented the second not.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trochee - a metrical unit with stressed-unstressed syllables
metrical foot, metrical unit, foot - (prosody) a group of 2 or 3 syllables forming the basic unit of poetic rhythm
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
trokee
trohej

trochee

[ˈtrɒkiː] Ntroqueo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

trochee

nTrochäus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, the stresses fall on the monosyllabic nouns ending lines 1 and 2, but the more fluid lines 3 and 4 end with trochees. This establishes a distinction between firm stress on stable materials (boats, shore) and the wavering stress on liquid (water) and process (nibbling).
trochees, a stressed syllable followed by an unstressed one, as in the word
The lines are tetrameters, described either as headless iambics or tailless trochees. The third lines have feminine endings, so they are clearly trochaic.
They apprehend the paradox that avoiding the "mechanical" involves calling upon the resources of "art." What drives the "Warm" beat of Hopkins's rhythms as they "rock" between iambs and trochees, dodging the constraints of a "cold" iambic pulse, is the mix of spontaneity and endeavour which Hopkins spoke of in his Parnassian letter, with a sure sense of the labours involved, as the "effort of inspiration" (Correspondence, 1: 68).
Or maybe the stanza's function is more purely formal: sonically introducing the "t" that will dominate the final couplet, metrically mediating the first line's trochees and the fifth line's cretic with a third line suggesting either.
And isn't it fitting that the legendarily modest Elizabeth Bishop was given no middle name, whereas Ronald Wilson Reagan is a name that, thanks to that lock-step succession of hard trochees, sounds positively imperious?
Southey declares his intention of substituting trochees for spondees in his imitation of the classical hexameter line because the "rapid[ity]" of English pronunciation precludes the occurrence of spondees (Southey 792).
If a word is pronounced as three trochees, the lengthening of the unstressed syllable will become more prominent in both regions both in the primary stressed foot and the first secondary-stressed foot.
Trochees line up stresses in stressed-stressless (dum di) pairs; iambs line them up in stressless-stressed (di dum) pairs; and anapests line them up in stressless-stressless-stressed (di di dum) triplets, as follows.
Trochaic meters were extensively used in ancient Greek and Latin tragedy and comedy in a form called trochaic catalectic tetrameter (seven and one half trochees), which was particularly favored by Plautus and Terence.
song-like rhythm, "Our Destiny" begins with heavy trochees and
(Phelpstead's essay has the most impressive erratum discovered in the book: in a description of the iambic pentameter line, it is said to have five feet, "each consisting of a stressed followed by an unstressed syllable"--iambs have become trochees (48).