trodden


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trod·den

 (trŏd′n)
v.
A past participle of tread.

trodden

(ˈtrɒdən)
vb
a past participle of tread

tread

(trɛd)

v. trod, trod•den trod, tread•ing, v.i.
1. to set down the foot or feet in walking; step; walk.
2. to step or walk, esp. so as to press, crush, or injure something; trample (usu. fol. by on or upon).
3. (of a male bird) to copulate.
v.t.
4. to step or walk on, about, in, or along.
5. to trample or crush underfoot.
6. to form by the action of walking or trampling: to tread a path.
7. to treat with disdainful harshness or cruelty; crush; oppress.
8. to perform by walking or dancing: to tread a measure.
9. (of a male bird) to copulate with (a female bird).
n.
10. the action of treading.
11. the sound of footsteps.
12. manner of treading or walking.
13. a single step.
14. any of various things or parts on which a person or thing treads, stands, or moves.
15. the horizontal upper surface of a step in a stair.
16. the part of a wheel, tire, or runner that bears on the road, rail, etc.
17. the pattern raised on or cut into the face of a rubber tire.
18. the part of a rail in contact with the treads of wheels.
19. the part of the undersurface of the foot or of a shoe that touches the ground.
Idioms:
1. tread on someone's toes, to offend or irritate someone.
2. tread water,
a. to maintain the body erect in the water with the head above the surface, usu. by a pumping movement of the legs and sometimes the arms.
b. to maintain one's position without making any progress.
[before 900; Middle English treden (v.), Old English tredan, c. Old High German tretan; akin to Old Norse trotha, Gothic trudan]
tread′er, n.
Translations

trodden

[ˈtrɒdən] pp of treadTrojan Horse [ˌtrəʊdʒənˈhɔːrs] n
(MYTHOLOGY)cheval m de Troie
(fig)cheval m de Troie
(COMPUTING)cheval m de Troie
References in classic literature ?
And lo, there spurted into his face all at once a cry of pain, and two curses and twenty bad invectives, so that in his fright he raised his stick and also struck the trodden one.
"Pardon me," said he to the trodden one, who had got up enraged, and had seated himself, "pardon me, and hear first of all a parable.
--"Whoever thou art," said the trodden one, still enraged, "thou treadest also too nigh me with thy parable, and not only with thy foot!
How eagerly he had trodden the very turf I was treading,--we never know at what moment we are treading sacred earth!
Men were at work here and there--for it was the season for "taking up" the meadows, or digging the little waterways clear for the winter irrigation, and mending their banks where trodden down by the cows.