troland


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troland

(ˈtrəʊlənd)
n
a unit of light intensity, used to measure the amount of light reaching the retina in the eye
References in periodicals archive ?
In August we reported that elderly Thomas McAvoy was ordered to stop harassing David and Sharon Troland following a bitter three-year dispute that began with the building of a large garage in the Trolands' back garden.
The National Academy of Sciences gave Beilock the 2017 Troland Research Award, recognizing achievements in experimental psychology from investigators under age 40.
I would like to thank: Aries Arugay, Ela Atienza, Cesi Cruz, Jennifer Keister and Erin Troland for sharing their time and insights; Allen Hicken for sharing COMELEC data; and the editors and anonymous reviewer for helpful feedback and suggestions.
Quality criterion - Name Szlltsi ido ajnlattevo raktrbl az ajnlatkro helyi biztonsgi raktrba az igny jelzstol szmtva az ajnlattevo raktrban troland eszkzk tekintetben (perc) / Weighting 5
Wilbur Wallace "Bill" Troland died September 21,2014, in Fairfield., Conn.
Troland's etc., which can be done in the Harvard Lab.?" Letter from William Moulton Marston to Robert Yerkes (Sept.
Asi, anualmente la United States National Academy of Sciences entrega el Troland Research Awards a investigadores sub-40 que trabajen las linea de conciencia y mundo fisico.
In addition to this recent award, he has received numerous prizes throughout his career, including the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology (1990), the Troland Research Award (1991) and the Award for Scientific Reviewing (2005) from the National Academy of Sciences (American Psychological Association, 2012a; 2012b), and Warren Medal (2009) from Society of Experimental Psychologists.
The tester chose locations throughout the central visual field to present stimuli, which consisted of 0.3-degree-size targets with a 50,000 troland retinal luminance, flashed for 0.5 seconds each.
Interviews with Edna Tyler, Judge Tom Troland, and Arlene Fones.
Trundle and Troland (2005) confirmed this when they evaluated 79 children's books that focused on the Moon as a topic or used the Moon prominently in illustrations; the results revealed that many books reinforce misconceptions about lunar phases and even misrepresent the Moon.