trompe l'oeil


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trompe l'oeil

 (trômp′ loi′)
n. pl. trompe l'oeils (loi′)
1. A style of painting that is intended to give a convincing illusion of reality.
2. A painting or effect created in this style.

[French trompe l'œil : trompe, third person sing. present tense of tromper, to deceive + le, the + œil, eye.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

trompe l'oeil

(French trɔ̃p lœj)
n, pl trompe l'oeils (trɔ̃p lœj)
1. (Art Terms) a painting or decoration giving a convincing illusion of reality
2. (Art Terms) an effect of this kind
[from French, literally: deception of the eye]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

trompe l'oeil

(Fr. trɔ̃p ˈlœ yə; Eng. ˈtrɔmp ˈleɪ, ˈlɔɪ)
n.
1. visual deception, esp. in paintings, in which objects are rendered in extremely fine detail emphasizing the illusion of tactile and spatial qualities.
2. a painting, mural, or panel of wallpaper designed to create such an effect.
[1895–1900; < French: literally, (it) fools the eye]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

trompe l'oeil

1. A French phrase meaning deceive the eye, used to mean a painting that is made to give an illusion of reality.
2. (in painting) The fine, detailed rendering of objects to convey the illusion of spatial and tactile qualities.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trompe l'oeil - a painting rendered in such great detail as to deceive the viewer concerning its reality
painting, picture - graphic art consisting of an artistic composition made by applying paints to a surface; "a small painting by Picasso"; "he bought the painting as an investment"; "his pictures hang in the Louvre"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

trompe l'oeil

[ˌtrɒmpˈlɔɪ] n (ART)trompe-l'œil m inv
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The effect is called trompe l'oeil, from the French, meaning deception of the eye.
I work with acrylic paints, the flexibility of which lends well to the signature trompe l'oeil effect that I strive to achieve in my works on canvas.
A Optical Illusionary Painting B Trompe l'oeil C Surrealism D Dadaism 5.
The original blue, gold and rust paint scheme was applied in trompe l'oeil style.
ART STYLE: Trompe L'oeil (pronounced "Tromp LOY") is French for "Deceive the Eye." This style of painting can be seen in works by the ancient Greeks, and has evolved over the centuries in subject, content and scale.
The juxtaposition of grained stone and stained fabric brings the sensuous illusionism of post-painterly abstraction disconcertingly close to another kind of visual effect, one we might call reverse trompe l'oeil. Whereas trompe l'oeil typically "fools the eye" by passing off a picture as three-dimensional reality, Moyer's work dematerializes stone into a weightless two-dimensional plane.
The museum's concept originated from "trompe l'oeil," which is French for "trick of the eye," an idea that emerged in ancient Greek and Roman times.
He discusses the application of political and aesthetic approaches to the study of early American novels, focusing on Hugh Henry Brackenridge's Modern Chivalry; the deceptive actions of picaresque con men, gothic villains, and sentimental seducers in early American novels, such as Charles Brockden Brown's Wieland and Arthur Mervyn; Susanna Rowson's Charlotte Temple, Royall Tyler's The Algerine Captive, and Tabitha Gilman Tenney's Female Quixotism; the visual arts, including Charles Wilson Peale and Raphaelle Peale's trompe l'oeil deception; and artistic negotiations of deception, sensuous cognition, and art in Susan Warner's The Wide, Wide World, Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, and Herman Melville's Moby-Dick.
The libraries have a beautiful painted trompe l'oeil ceiling.
Over his career, the artist worked in various locations, including Antwerp, Regensburg, Hamburg, and Copenhagen, and it was in the latter city where he created his signature series of trompe l'oeil (deception of the eye) paintings during 1668-1672.
The artist is Frederick Clifford Harrison, a Londonborn painter of still lifes who went on to become preeminent as a 20th century painter of trompe l'oeil pictures to give them their correct title.
Such trompe l'oeil, Bishop believes, is "a studied craft, to a certain extent.