troop


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

troop

 (tro͞op)
n.
1.
a. A group of soldiers.
b. troops Military units; soldiers.
c. A unit of cavalry, armored vehicles, or artillery in a European army, corresponding to a platoon in the US Army.
2. A unit of at least five Boy Scouts or Girl Scouts under the guidance of an adult leader.
3. A group or company of people, animals, or things.
intr.v. trooped, troop·ing, troops
To move or go as a group or in large numbers: The students trooped into the auditorium.

[French troupe, from Old French trope, probably from Vulgar Latin *troppu-.]

troop

(truːp)
n
1. a large group or assembly; flock: a troop of children.
2. (Military) a subdivision of a cavalry squadron or artillery battery of about platoon size
3. (Military) (plural) armed forces; soldiers
4. a large group of Scouts comprising several patrols
5. (Theatre) an archaic spelling of troupe
vb
6. (intr) to gather, move, or march in or as if in a crowd
7. (Military) (tr) military chiefly Brit to parade (the colour or flag) ceremonially: trooping the colour.
8. (Military) (tr) military slang Brit (formerly) to report (a serviceman) for a breach of discipline
9. (intr) an archaic word for consort1
[C16: from French troupe, from troupeau flock, of Germanic origin]

troop

(trup)

n.
1. an assemblage of persons or things; company; band.
2. a cavalry unit corresponding in size to a company of infantry.
3. troops,
a. a body of soldiers, police, etc.
b. soldiers, esp. enlisted persons.
4. a unit of Boy Scouts or Girl Scouts usu. having a maximum of 32 members under an adult leader.
5. a herd, flock, or swarm.
6. Archaic. a band or troupe of actors.
v.i.
7. to gather in a company; flock together.
8. to come, go, or pass in great numbers; throng.
9. to walk, as if in a march; go: trooping down to breakfast.
10. to associate or consort (usu. fol. by with).
11. Chiefly Brit. to carry (the flag or colors) in a ceremonial way before troops.
[1535–45; < French troupe, Old French trope, probably back formation from tropel herd, flock]

Troop, Troupe

 a collection of people; a company; a number of things; soldiers collectively; a company of actors. See also band, party.
Examples: troop of baboons; of bees, 1812; of children, 1833; of dogfish; of doves, 1847; of friends, 1605; of gladiators, 1863; of gypsies, 1711; of kangaroos—Brewer; of lions; of lovers, 1881; of monkeys—Brewer; of sheep, 1587; of soldiers, 1794; of stars, 1601; of tenements; of wolves, 1719; troupe of acrobats; of actors, 1779; of dancers—Brewer; of minstrels, 1584; of players.

troop


Past participle: trooped
Gerund: trooping

Imperative
troop
troop
Present
I troop
you troop
he/she/it troops
we troop
you troop
they troop
Preterite
I trooped
you trooped
he/she/it trooped
we trooped
you trooped
they trooped
Present Continuous
I am trooping
you are trooping
he/she/it is trooping
we are trooping
you are trooping
they are trooping
Present Perfect
I have trooped
you have trooped
he/she/it has trooped
we have trooped
you have trooped
they have trooped
Past Continuous
I was trooping
you were trooping
he/she/it was trooping
we were trooping
you were trooping
they were trooping
Past Perfect
I had trooped
you had trooped
he/she/it had trooped
we had trooped
you had trooped
they had trooped
Future
I will troop
you will troop
he/she/it will troop
we will troop
you will troop
they will troop
Future Perfect
I will have trooped
you will have trooped
he/she/it will have trooped
we will have trooped
you will have trooped
they will have trooped
Future Continuous
I will be trooping
you will be trooping
he/she/it will be trooping
we will be trooping
you will be trooping
they will be trooping
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been trooping
you have been trooping
he/she/it has been trooping
we have been trooping
you have been trooping
they have been trooping
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been trooping
you will have been trooping
he/she/it will have been trooping
we will have been trooping
you will have been trooping
they will have been trooping
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been trooping
you had been trooping
he/she/it had been trooping
we had been trooping
you had been trooping
they had been trooping
Conditional
I would troop
you would troop
he/she/it would troop
we would troop
you would troop
they would troop
Past Conditional
I would have trooped
you would have trooped
he/she/it would have trooped
we would have trooped
you would have trooped
they would have trooped
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.troop - a group of soldierstroop - a group of soldiers      
army unit - a military unit that is part of an army
shock troops - soldiers who are specially trained and armed to lead an assault
2.troop - a cavalry unit corresponding to an infantry companytroop - a cavalry unit corresponding to an infantry company
army unit - a military unit that is part of an army
cavalry - a highly mobile army unit
3.troop - a unit of Girl or Boy Scoutstroop - a unit of Girl or Boy Scouts  
social unit, unit - an organization regarded as part of a larger social group; "the coach said the offensive unit did a good job"; "after the battle the soldier had trouble rejoining his unit"
4.troop - an orderly crowdtroop - an orderly crowd; "a troop of children"
crowd - a large number of things or people considered together; "a crowd of insects assembled around the flowers"
Verb1.troop - march in a processiontroop - march in a procession; "the veterans paraded down the street"
march, process - march in a procession; "They processed into the dining room"
2.troop - move or march as if in a crowdtroop - move or march as if in a crowd; "They children trooped into the room"
march - walk fast, with regular or measured steps; walk with a stride; "He marched into the classroom and announced the exam"; "The soldiers marched across the border"

troop

noun
1. group, company, team, body, unit, band, crowd, pack, squad, gathering, crew (informal), drove, gang, bunch (informal), flock, herd, contingent, swarm, horde, multitude, throng, posse (informal), bevy, assemblage She was aware of a little troop of travellers watching them.
plural noun soldiers, men, armed forces, servicemen, fighting men, military, army, soldiery the deployment of more than 35,000 troops from a dozen countries
verb
1. plod, trail, tramp, trudge, traipse, drag yourself, schlep (U.S. informal) They all trooped back to the house for a rest.
2. flock, march, crowd, stream, parade, swarm, throng, traipse (informal) The VIPs trooped into the hall and sat down.

troop

noun
1. A number of persons who have come or been gathered together:
Informal: get-together.
2. A group of people acting together in a shared activity:
verb
1. To come or go in large numbers:
2. To be with as a companion:
Slang: hang out.
Idiom: rub elbows.
Translations
جَماعَه، مَجْموعَهفِرْقَه، قُوّاتيَحْتَشِد، يَتَجَمْهَر
oddílskupinatrupahrnout se
enhedfloktroppe op
joukkokomppaniasotajoukko
cserkészcsapat
hersveit, riddaraliîssveithópasthópur, flokkur, hjörî
eiti būriusugužėti
barsgrupaiet barākaraspēka vienībapulcēties
nahrnúť sa
askerî birlikgrup hâlinde gitmekkalabalıksürü

troop

[truːp]
A. N
1. (Mil) → tropa f; [of cavalry] → escuadrón m troopstropas fpl
2. (gen) → banda f, grupo m; (= gang) → cuadrilla f (Theat) = troupe to come in a troopvenir en tropel or en masa
3. (= sound) the steady troop of feetel ruido rítmico de pasos
B. VI (= walk) to troop in/past/off/outentrar/pasar/marcharse/salir en tropel, entrar/pasar/marcharse/salir atropelladamente
C. VT to troop the colour (Brit) → presentar la bandera
D. CPD troop carrier N (= plane, ship) → transporte m (militar)
troop ship N(buque m de) transporte m
troop train Ntren m militar

troop

[ˈtruːp]
n
(MILITARY) (= group of soldiers) (in cavalry or tank regiment)escadron m
[boy scouts] → troupe f
(= group) [people, animals] → groupe m troops
npl (MILITARY) (= soldiers) → troupes fpl
British troops → les troupes britanniques
35,000 troops → 35 000 soldats
modif (MILITARY) [movements, deployment, presence] → de troupes; [reductions, reinforcements, withdrawal] → des troupes
vi
to troop in → entrer en groupe
to troop out → sortir en groupe
They all trooped back to the house → Ils rentrèrent tous à la maison en groupe.
vt (British) to troop the colour → défiler avec le drapeautroop carrier n
(= truck) → transport m de troupes
(= plane) → avion m de transport militaire

troop

n
(Mil, of cavalry) → Trupp m; (= unit)Schwadron f
troops pl (Mil) → Truppen pl; a dozen of our best troopszwölf unserer besten Soldaten; 200 troops200 Soldaten
(of Scouts)Stamm m
(of people)Horde f (pej), → Schar f
vi to troop out/inhinaus-/hineinströmen; to troop upstairsnach oben strömen; to troop past somethingan etw (dat)vorbeiziehen; to troop away or offabziehen (inf); to troop upherbeiströmen
vt (Brit Mil) to troop the coloursdie Fahnenparade abhalten; the colours being trooped todaydie Fahnen bei der heutigen Parade; the trooping of the coloursdie Fahnenparade

troop

:
troop reduction
nTruppenabbau m
troopship
n(Truppen)transportschiff nt
trooptrain
nTruppentransportzug m
troop withdrawal
nTruppenabzug m

troop

[truːp]
1. n (gen, of scouts) → gruppo (Mil) → squadrone m troops npl (Mil) → truppe fpl
2. vi (walk) to troop in/past/offentrare/passare/andarsene in gruppo
trooping the colour (Brit) → cerimonia del saluto alla bandiera

troop

(truːp) noun
1. a group of ordinary soldiers.
2. a crowd or collection (of people or animals). A troop of visitors arrived.
verb
to go in a group. They all trooped into his office.
ˈtrooper noun
an ordinary soldier.
troops noun plural
soldiers.
References in classic literature ?
Number Fifteen, E troop, Ninth Lancers--Dick Cunliffe's horse.
That's one of our recruits," said the old mule to the troop horse.
Almost daily new prisoners were brought in, and about three weeks after I was brought in to the post a troop of cavalry came from the south to relieve one of the troops stationed there.
I had been a prisoner at the little frontier post for over a month, when orders came to Colonel Belik to hasten to the eastern frontier with the major portion of his command, leaving only one troop to garrison the fort.
In the second, it's annoyin' to my feelin's - an' I'm Disko Troop o' the "We're Here" o' Gloucester, which you don't seem rightly to know.
23 the Russian troops were crossing the river Enns.
It was a journey of fifteen days through part of the country possessed by the Galles, which made it necessary to take troops with us for our security; yet, notwithstanding this precaution, the hazard of the expedition appeared so great, that our friends bid us farewell with tears, and looked upon us as destined to unavoidable destruction.
The whole country was then a wilderness, and it was necessary to transport the bag gage of the troops by means of the rivers—a devious but practicable route.
The green men were expecting an exodus of a body of red troops from the nearest city gate, and they were lying there in ambush to leap upon them.
When all this was done, and the army disciplined, and the herald Mouse had duly proclaimed war by challenging the Weasels, the newly chosen generals bound their heads with straws, that they might be more conspicuous to all their troops.
The youth, peering once through a sud- den rift in a cloud, saw a brown mass of troops, interwoven and magnified until they appeared to be thousands.
It certainly was little less than sacrilege," replied Grandfather; "but the time was coming when even the churches, where hallowed pastors had long preached the word of God, were to be torn down or desecrated by the British troops.