trooper


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trooper

soldier or police officer: He was a state trooper.
Not to be confused with:
trouper – actor; dependable person: He’s always on time—a real trouper.

troop·er

 (tro͞o′pər)
n.
1.
a. A member of a unit of cavalry.
b. A cavalry horse.
2.
a. A mounted police officer.
b. A state police officer.
3. also trouper A reliable, uncomplaining, often hard-working person.

trooper

(ˈtruːpə)
n
1. (Military) a soldier in a cavalry regiment
2. (Law) US and Austral a mounted policeman
3. (Law) US a state policeman
4. (Military) a cavalry horse
5. (Military) informal chiefly Brit a troopship

troop•er

(ˈtru pər)

n.
1. a mounted police officer.
3. a cavalry soldier.
4. a cavalry horse.
[1630–40]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trooper - a soldier in a motorized army unittrooper - a soldier in a motorized army unit  
cavalry, horse cavalry, horse - troops trained to fight on horseback; "500 horse led the attack"
soldier - an enlisted man or woman who serves in an army; "the soldiers stood at attention"
2.trooper - a mounted policemantrooper - a mounted policeman      
police officer, policeman, officer - a member of a police force; "it was an accident, officer"
3.trooper - a state police officertrooper - a state police officer    
police officer, policeman, officer - a member of a police force; "it was an accident, officer"
4.trooper - a soldier mounted on horsebacktrooper - a soldier mounted on horseback; "a cavalryman always takes good care of his mount"
cavalry - a highly mobile army unit
cuirassier - a cavalryman equipped with a cuirass
dragoon - a member of a European military unit formerly composed of heavily armed cavalrymen
hussar - a member of a European light cavalry unit; renowned for elegant dress
lancer - (formerly) a cavalryman armed with a lance
Rough Rider - a member of the volunteer cavalry regiment led by Theodore Roosevelt in the Spanish-American War (1898)
soldier - an enlisted man or woman who serves in an army; "the soldiers stood at attention"
Translations
جُنْدي في سِلاح الطَّيران
vojín
soldat
hermaîur, riddaraliîi

trooper

[ˈtruːpəʳ] N
1. (Mil) → soldado mf (de caballería)
to swear like a trooperjurar or hablar como un carretero
2. (US) (= policeman) → policía mf montado/a

trooper

[ˈtruːpər] n
(MILITARY) (in cavalry)soldat m de cavalerie; (in tank regiment)soldat m (d'un régiment de chars d'assaut)
(US) (= policeman) → gendarme m

trooper

n (Mil) → berittener Soldat, Kavallerist m; (US: = state trooper) → Staatspolizist(in) m(f); to swear like a trooper (Brit inf) → wie ein Kutscher fluchen

trooper

[ˈtruːpəʳ] n (Mil) → soldato di cavalleria (Am) (policeman) → poliziotto agente della polizia di uno stato
to swear like a trooper → bestemmiare come un turco

troop

(truːp) noun
1. a group of ordinary soldiers.
2. a crowd or collection (of people or animals). A troop of visitors arrived.
verb
to go in a group. They all trooped into his office.
ˈtrooper noun
an ordinary soldier.
troops noun plural
soldiers.
References in classic literature ?
Making his way to Nashville, already occupied by the Army of General Buell, he enlisted in the first organization that he found, a Kentucky regiment of cavalry, and in due time passed through all the stages of military evolution from raw recruit to experienced trooper. A right good trooper he was, too, although in his oral narrative from which this tale is made there was no mention of that; the fact was learned from his surviving comrades.
He felt them on his cheek, and saw them sparkle on the breast of his trooper's jacket.
Trooper was never yet billeted upon a household more unlike him.
The trooper (if trooper he be or have been) takes her bonnet off, with a light touch for so strong a hand, and pats her on the head.
A trooper, braver than his fellows, leaped among the kicking, plunging, fear-maddened beasts in a futile attempt to quiet them.
"I should never have expected you to go out as a trooper."
As the trooper cantered off, Kim crawled round to the back of the house, where, going on his Lahore experiences, he judged there would be food - and information.
I dismounted to bandage the shoulder of my trooper. It was only a nasty long scratch.
Manicamp, leaning on the arm of a gigantic trooper, as firm as the pillar of a cathedral, replied in his usual tranquil tone of voice, -- "And you, monsieur?"
The soldiers passed in a semicircle round something where the ball had fallen, and an old trooper on the flank, a noncommissioned officer who had stopped beside the dead men, ran to catch up his line and, falling into step with a hop, looked back angrily, and through the ominous silence and the regular tramp of feet beating the ground in unison, one seemed to hear left...
A trooper does not much care if he loses a weapon - Government must make it good - but he deeply resents the loss of his sleep.
All possible precautions had been taken against the terrorists, and the way from the cathedral, through Lisbon's streets, was double-banked with troops, while a squad of two hundred mounted troopers surrounded the carriage.