troops


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troop

 (tro͞op)
n.
1.
a. A group of soldiers.
b. troops Military units; soldiers.
c. A unit of cavalry, armored vehicles, or artillery in a European army, corresponding to a platoon in the US Army.
2. A unit of at least five Boy Scouts or Girl Scouts under the guidance of an adult leader.
3. A group or company of people, animals, or things.
intr.v. trooped, troop·ing, troops
To move or go as a group or in large numbers: The students trooped into the auditorium.

[French troupe, from Old French trope, probably from Vulgar Latin *troppu-.]

troops

  • squadron - Borrowed from Italian squadrone, from Latin quadrare, "square"; the sense of "military group" comes from an earlier "square formation of troops."
  • campaign - First meant an open tract of land, from Latin campus, "level ground," and the change to a military meaning came from troops "taking the field"—moving from fortress or town to open country—from which the political sense evolved, referring to the organized efforts of office-seekers to sway public opinion or influence their vote at an upcoming election.
  • echelon - Comes from French echelle, "ladder," from Latin scala, and first meant a formation of troops.
  • corporal - Its military meaning came from "the head of a body of troops," from French caporale.

troops

A collective term for uniformed military personnel (usually not applicable to naval personnel afloat). See also airborne troops; combat service support elements; combat support troops; service troops; tactical troops.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.troops - soldiers collectivelytroops - soldiers collectively    
army unit - a military unit that is part of an army
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
personnel, force - group of people willing to obey orders; "a public force is necessary to give security to the rights of citizens"
friendly - troops belonging to or allied with your own military forces; "friendlies came to their rescue"
hostile - troops belonging to the enemy's military forces; "the platoon ran into a pack of hostiles"
cavalry, horse cavalry, horse - troops trained to fight on horseback; "500 horse led the attack"
garrison - the troops who maintain and guard a fortified place
Translations
جُنُودقُوّات
vojácivojsko
soldatertropper
sotajoukot
trupe
katonaság
herliî
軍隊
군대
vojaci
čete
trupper
กองทหาร
askerlerbirlikler
lính

troop

(truːp) noun
1. a group of ordinary soldiers.
2. a crowd or collection (of people or animals). A troop of visitors arrived.
verb
to go in a group. They all trooped into his office.
ˈtrooper noun
an ordinary soldier.
troops noun plural
soldiers.

troops

جُنُود vojsko soldater Truppen στρατεύματα tropas sotajoukot troupes trupe truppe 軍隊 군대 troepen tropper wojsko tropa войска trupper กองทหาร birlikler lính 部队
References in classic literature ?
These troops had apparently been going for- ward with caution, their rifles held in readiness, when the youthful lieutenant had discovered them and their movement had been interrupted by the volley from the blue regiment.
At this cry a hysterical fear and dismay beset the troops. A soldier, who heretofore had been am- bitious to make the regiment into a wise little band that would proceed calmly amid the huge- appearing difficulties, suddenly sank down and buried his face in his arms with an air of bowing to a doom.
"It certainly was little less than sacrilege," replied Grandfather; "but the time was coming when even the churches, where hallowed pastors had long preached the word of God, were to be torn down or desecrated by the British troops. Some years passed, however, before such things were done."
"Now, children," said Grandfather, "I wish to make you comprehend the position of the British troops in King Street.
Last came the screw guns, and Billy the mule carried himself as though he commanded all the troops, and his harness was oiled and polished till it winked.
23 the Russian troops were crossing the river Enns.
Troops, sometimes mounted and sometimes afoot, left the post daily for what I assumed to be patrol duty.
It was a journey of fifteen days through part of the country possessed by the Galles, which made it necessary to take troops with us for our security; yet, notwithstanding this precaution, the hazard of the expedition appeared so great, that our friends bid us farewell with tears, and looked upon us as destined to unavoidable destruction.
The whole country was then a wilderness, and it was necessary to transport the bag gage of the troops by means of the rivers—a devious but practicable route.
The green men were expecting an exodus of a body of red troops from the nearest city gate, and they were lying there in ambush to leap upon them.
They therefore chose as leaders Mice that were most renowned for their family descent, strength, and counsel, as well as those most noted for their courage in the fight, so that they might be better marshaled in battle array and formed into troops, regiments, and battalions.
In the second, it's annoyin' to my feelin's - an' I'm Disko Troop o' the "We're Here" o' Gloucester, which you don't seem rightly to know."