tropopause

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Related to tropopauses: stratosphere

tro·po·pause

 (trō′pə-pôz′, trŏp′ə-)
n.
The boundary between the troposphere and the stratosphere varying in altitude from approximately 8 kilometers (5 miles) at the poles to approximately 18 kilometers (11 miles) at the equator.

tropopause

(ˈtrɒpəˌpɔːz)
n
(Physical Geography) meteorol the plane of discontinuity between the troposphere and the stratosphere, characterized by a sharp change in the lapse rate and varying in altitude from about 18 km (11 miles) above the equator to 6 km (4 miles) at the Poles

trop•o•pause

(ˈtrɒp əˌpɔz, ˈtroʊ pə-)

n.
the boundary, or transitional layer, between the troposphere and the stratosphere.
[1915–20]

tro·po·pause

(trō′pə-pôz′, trŏp′ə-pôz′)
The boundary between the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere, varying in altitude from about 5 miles (8 kilometers) at the poles to 11 miles (17.7 kilometers) at the equator.

tropopause

The transition zone between the stratosphere and the troposphere. The tropopause normally occurs at an altitude of about 25,000 to 45,000 feet (8 to 15 kilometers) in polar and temperate zones, and at 55,000 feet (20 kilometers) in the tropics.

tropopause

the zone between the troposphere and the stratosphere where the temperature remains relatively constant above a given point on earth.
See also: Atmosphere

tropopause

The thin layer of the atmosphere, about 3 mi (5km) thick, that lies between the troposphere and the stratosphere.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tropopause - the region of discontinuity between the troposphere and the stratospheretropopause - the region of discontinuity between the troposphere and the stratosphere
layer - a relatively thin sheetlike expanse or region lying over or under another
troposphere - the lowest atmospheric layer; from 4 to 11 miles high (depending on latitude)
Translations

tropopause

n (Met) → Tropopause f
References in periodicals archive ?
Severe storms are often associated with the higher ranges, but tropical air masses with high tropopauses also allow tall storms.
This value appears to divide cold, near-threshold non-TT events occurring under elevated tropopauses (light gray backgrounds in Fig.
Then, in the 1980s, NASA spacecraft discovered that tropopauses are also present in the atmospheres of the planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, as well as Saturn's largest moon, Titan, and this happen at the same level in the atmosphere of each of these different worlds-at a pressure of about 0.