trough


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trough

 (trôf, trŏf)
n.
1.
a. A long, narrow, generally shallow receptacle for holding water or feed for animals.
b. Any of various similar containers for domestic or industrial use, such as kneading or washing.
2. A gutter under the edge of a roof for carrying off rainwater.
3. A long, narrow depression, as between waves or ridges.
4. A low point in a business cycle or on a statistical graph.
5. Meteorology An elongated region of relatively low atmospheric pressure, often associated with a front.
6. Physics A minimum point in a wave or an alternating signal.

[Middle English, from Old English trog; see deru- in Indo-European roots.]

trough

(trɒf)
n
1. a narrow open container, esp one in which food or water for animals is put
2. a narrow channel, gutter, or gulley
3. (Physical Geography) a narrow depression either in the land surface, ocean bed, or between two successive waves
4. (Physical Geography) meteorol an elongated area of low pressure, esp an extension of a depression. Compare ridge6
5. a single or temporary low point; depression
6. (General Physics) physics the portion of a wave, such as a light wave, in which the amplitude lies below its average value
7. (Economics) economics the lowest point or most depressed stage of the trade cycle
vb
(intr) informal to eat, consume, or take greedily
[Old English trōh; related to Old Saxon, Old Norse trog trough, Dutch trügge ladle]
ˈtroughˌlike adj

trough

(trɔf, trɒf or, sometimes, trɔθ, trɒθ)

n.
1. a long, narrow, open receptacle, usu. boxlike in shape, used chiefly to hold water or food for animals.
2. any of several similarly shaped receptacles used for various commercial or household purposes.
3. a channel or conduit for conveying water, as a gutter under the eaves of a building.
4. any long depression or hollow.
5. a long, wide, and deep depression in the ocean floor having gently sloping sides, wider and shallower than a trench.
6. an elongated area of relatively low barometric pressure.
7. the lowest point, esp. in an economic cycle.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English trōh, c. Old Frisian, Old Saxon, Old Norse trog, Old High German troc]

trough

(trôf)
The lowest part of a wave. See more at wave.

trough

An elongated area of low pressure between two areas of high pressure.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trough - a narrow depression (as in the earth or between ocean waves or in the ocean bed)trough - a narrow depression (as in the earth or between ocean waves or in the ocean bed)
natural depression, depression - a sunken or depressed geological formation
swale - a low area (especially a marshy area between ridges)
2.trough - a channel along the eaves or on the rooftrough - a channel along the eaves or on the roof; collects and carries away rainwater
channel - a passage for water (or other fluids) to flow through; "the fields were crossed with irrigation channels"; "gutters carried off the rainwater into a series of channels under the street"
slideway, sloping trough, chute, slide - sloping channel through which things can descend
cullis - a gutter in a roof
gable roof, saddle roof, saddleback roof, saddleback - a double sloping roof with a ridge and gables at each end
3.trough - a concave shape with an open toptrough - a concave shape with an open top  
concave shape, concavity, incurvation, incurvature - a shape that curves or bends inward
4.trough - a treasury for government fundstrough - a treasury for government funds  
exchequer, treasury - the funds of a government or institution or individual
5.trough - a long narrow shallow receptacletrough - a long narrow shallow receptacle  
receptacle - a container that is used to put or keep things in
cradle, rocker - a trough that can be rocked back and forth; used by gold miners to shake auriferous earth in water in order to separate the gold
6.trough - a container (usually in a barn or stable) from which cattle or horses feedtrough - a container (usually in a barn or stable) from which cattle or horses feed
bunk, feed bunk - a long trough for feeding cattle
container - any object that can be used to hold things (especially a large metal boxlike object of standardized dimensions that can be loaded from one form of transport to another)

trough

noun manger, crib, water trough The old stone cattle trough still sits by the entrance.
Translations
جُرْنحَوْض لِعَلَف الماشِيَهغَوْرنِطاق طولي من الضَّغْط المُنْخَفِض
korytoúdolídeprese
trugbølgedalkarlavtryksområderende
kaukalo
korito
vályúhullámvölgylégnyomási teknõ
lágòrÿstisvæîi, lægîöldudalurtrog
かいば桶
여물통
lovysžemo slėgio zona
ieplakasilezema spiediena josla
brázda nízkeho tlaku
korito
tråg
รางอาหารหรือน้ำสำหรับสัตว์
yalakyemlikalçak basınç alanıiki dalga arası çukuru
máng ăn

trough

[trɒf] N
1. (= depression) → depresión f, hoyo m; (between waves, on graph) → seno m; (= channel) → canal m (fig) → parte f baja, punto m más bajo
see also peak A3
2. (Met) → zona f de bajas presiones
3. (for animals) (= feeding trough) → comedero m, pesebre m; (= drinking trough) → abrevadero m, bebedero m; (= kneading trough) → artesa f

trough

[ˈtrɒf] n
(also drinking trough) → abreuvoir m
(also feeding trough) → auge f
(= low area between waves) → creux m
(= low point) (in trade, business, consumption, evolution)creux m
to be in a trough [person, industry, market] → être au creux de la vague
(METEOROLOGY) trough of low pressure → dépression f

trough

n
(= container)Trog m; drinking troughWassertrog m
(= depression)Furche f, → Rille f; (between waves, on graph) → Tal nt; (Met) → Trog m; trough of depressionTiefdrucktrog m

trough

[trɒf] n
a. (also feeding trough) → mangiatoia, trogolo (also drinking trough) → abbeveratoio; (channel) → canale m
b. (between waves) → cavo; (on graph) → punto più basso (Met) trough of low pressurearea di bassa pressione, depressione f

trough

(trof) noun
1. a long, low, open container for animals' food or water. a drinking-trough for the cattle.
2. a low part between two waves (in the sea etc). The boat went down into a trough.
3. an area of low pressure in the atmosphere, usually causing rain.

trough

جُرْن koryto trug Trog σκάφη abrevadero kaukalo abreuvoir korito trogolo かいば桶 여물통 trog trau koryto bebedouro корыто tråg รางอาหารหรือน้ำสำหรับสัตว์ yalak máng ăn

trough

n. canal o zanja.
References in classic literature ?
Soon you see him returning with Kolory, who bears the god Moa Artua in his arms, and carries in one hand a small trough, hollowed out in the likeness of a canoe.
In this exercise I once met an accident, which had like to have cost me my life; for, one of the pages having put my boat into the trough, the governess who attended Glumdalclitch very officiously lifted me up, to place me in the boat: but I happened to slip through her fingers, and should infallibly have fallen down forty feet upon the floor, if, by the luckiest chance in the world, I had not been stopped by a corking-pin that stuck in the good gentlewoman's stomacher; the head of the pin passing between my shirt and the waistband of my breeches, and thus I was held by the middle in the air, till Glumdalclitch ran to my relief.
Shortly after this, another, not knowing what had happened (for the carrier still lay senseless), came with the same object of giving water to his mules, and was proceeding to remove the armour in order to clear the trough, when Don Quixote, without uttering a word or imploring aid from anyone, once more dropped his buckler and once more lifted his lance, and without actually breaking the second carrier's head into pieces, made more than three of it, for he laid it open in four.
Then there came up through the floor of the room a three-headed Giant with a trough full of meat, who saluted her as his sister and set down the trough before her.
Horseshoes, swords, and the heads of halberds, or bills, are often found there ; one place is called the ``Danes' well,'' another the ``Battle flats.'' From a tradition that the weapon with which the Norwegian champion was slain, resembled a pear, or, as others say, that the trough or boat in which the soldier floated under the bridge to strike the blow, had such a shape, the country people usually begin a great market, which is held at Stamford, with an entertainment called the Pear-pie feast, which after all may be a corruption of the Spear-pie feast.
My hold had been broken loose, I was under water, and the thought passed through my mind that this was the terrible thing of which I had heard, the being swept in the trough of the sea.
It was put into a large wooden tray or trough, and set down upon the ground.
The infant is laid in a wooden trough, by way of cradle.
In front of the house was a great stone trough, so she said to the child: 'Take the pail, Red-Cap; I made some sausages yesterday, so carry the water in which I boiled them to the trough.' Red-Cap carried until the great trough was quite full.
A deep and careless incision had been made into each tree, near its root, into which little spouts, formed of the I bark of the alder, or of the sumach, were fastened; and a trough, roughly dug out of the linden, or basswood, was I lying at the root of each tree, to catch the sap that flowed from this extremely wasteful and inartificial arrangement.
Down into the trough we went, wallowing like the carcass of a dead whale, and then began the fight, with rudder and propellers, to force the Coldwater back into the teeth of the gale and drive her on and on, farther and farther from relentless thirty.
Fedot, don't let out the gelding, but take it to the trough, and we'll put the other in harness."