true-false test

true-false test

(tro͞o′fôls′)
n.
A test in which statements are to be marked either true or false.

true′-false′ test`



n.
a test requiring one to mark statements as either true or false.
[1920–25]
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, a student may score 50% on a 100-item, true-false test by guessing, but 50% represents failure.
Key Words: Multiple choice test, true-false test, difficulty coefficient, discriminating coefficient, reliability.
Toppino and Brochin' (1989) findings indicated that exposure to statement on a true-false test increased student's tendency to believe that the statement was true regardless of whether the statement actually was true or false.
According to Table 3, there is a statistically significant difference between the answer averages of the 28 items in terms of t values that are calculated according to the multiple-choice and true-false test results of parallel structure which were applied in the academic year.
According to Table 4, the discriminating indices and difficulty levels of parallel structure multiple-choice and true-false test items were at the same level, and the t values found for each pair of the items were not statistically significant.
There were no statistically significant differences between the multiple-choice and true-false test averages on the basis of sex (Table 2).
When multiple choice or true-false test items are used, the scoring of exams is easily accomplished.
Take the following true-false test, prepared by Apco Associates, Inc., Sacramento, Calif., to reveal how much you know about the condition:
I hate true-false tests. I usually have to flip a coin.
Selected-response measures are the traditional forms of assessment--multiple-choice, matching and true-false tests. Constructed-response measures include live skill performances, open-ended questions requiring written answers, student projects and portfolios.