truepenny

true·pen·ny

 (tro͞o′pĕn′ē)
n. pl. true·pen·nies
An honest, trustworthy person.

truepenny

(ˈtruːˌpɛnɪ)
n, pl -nies
archaic an honest, trustworthy person
References in classic literature ?
Well worth thinking of, old Truepenny! If the worst comes to the worst, well worth thinking of!"
Chief Justice Truepenny agrees that the law had been violated and that judges, both at trial and on appeal, have no choice but to uphold the conviction.
The exchange between Chief Justice Truepenny and Justice Keen about executive clemency probes at some depth enduringly important debates about separation of powers and the judicial role.
This one's on Uncle Truepenny." Natural pulled a wad of bills from his pocket, fanning them in the night air.
(45.) Oldbuck, who always, albeit begrudgingly, bows to Edie's discernment, hails the bagger after his wise remark with a fitting monetary metaphor (which he quotes from Hamlet): "Aha, old Truepenny, art thou there?" (409).
thou there, truepenny? / Come on, you hear this fellow in the
There are puzzles young people can work on in the "Words, Words, Words" section, where they can create insults using early modern language, figure out the meaning of "weird words" like "hurly burly" or "truepenny," or examine sketches from early modern texts and describe them in their own words.
The "removed ground" of the battlements is a passage between the physical and the metaphysical spheres by the threefold now narrated, now live appearance of the roaming spirit "doomed to walk the night" restlessly, without a local habitation and a proper name as signifier: "thing," "fantasy," "dreaded sight," "apparition," "portentious figure," "illusion," "spirit of health or goblin damned," "poor ghost," "truepenny," "old mole," "worthy pioneer," "perturbed spirit"--a sequence of confused attempts at naming the unnameable.
Chief Justice Truepenny votes to uphold the verdict because the statute "permits of no exception applicable to this case, however our sympathies may incline us to make allowance for the tragic situation in which these men found themselves." (16) But the Chief Justice also urges the Court to join in the clemency petition to the Chief Executive.
Justice Foster first criticizes Chief Justice Truepenny's exhortation to seek clemency as "an expedient at once so sordid and so obvious": I believe something more is on trial in this case than the fate of these unfortunate explorers; that is the law of our Commonwealth.
And what would one make of this creation: ''truepenny detail/vermifuge fennec slurry/pattee interline?'' It's one of 5.75 x 10 to the power of 30 possible haiku that can be made by randomly combining words from the English dictionary.
At the beginning of Stephen's lecture, when AE objects to the autobiographical argument, the narrator reports in Stephen's mind the phrase Hamlet makes to the phantasmic voice of the ghost who commands Horatio and the watch to swear to obey Hamlet's wishes: "Art thou there, truepenny?" (187).