trumpery

(redirected from trumperies)
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trump·er·y

(trŭm′pə-rē)
n. pl. trump·er·ies
1. Showy but worthless finery; bric-a-brac.
2. Nonsense; rubbish.
3. Deception; trickery; fraud.

[Middle English trompery, deceit, from Middle French tromperie, from tromper, to deceive, from Old French se tromper de (quelqu'un), to deceive, mock (literally, "to play (someone) like a trumpet"), from tromper, to play the trumpet, from trompe, horn, trumpet; see trumpet.]

trumpery

(ˈtrʌmpərɪ)
n, pl -eries
1. foolish talk or actions
2. a useless or worthless article; trinket
adj
useless or worthless
[C15: from Old French tromperie deceit, from tromper to cheat]

trump•er•y

(ˈtrʌm pə ri)

n., pl. -ries,
adj. n.
1. something without use or value.
2. nonsense; twaddle.
3. Archaic. worthless finery.
adj.
4. of little or no value; worthless; rubbishy.
[1425–75; late Middle English trompery deceit < Middle French tromperie=tromp(er) to deceive (Middle French: to trifle, play with, orig., to play the trumpet; see trump2) + -erie -ery]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trumpery - nonsensical talk or writing
drivel, garbage - a worthless message
jargon, lingo, patois, argot, vernacular, slang, cant - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"
2.trumpery - ornamental objects of no great valuetrumpery - ornamental objects of no great value
decoration, ornament, ornamentation - something used to beautify
Translations

trumpery

[ˈtrʌmpərɪ]
A. ADJ (= frivolous) → frívolo; (= valueless) → inútil, sin valor; (= insignificant) → sin importancia; (= trashy) → de relumbrón
B. Noropel m

trumpery

nPlunder m no pl; (= ornaments)Kitsch m; (= jewellery)Flitterkram m; (= nonsense)Unsinn m
adjbillig; ornaments alsokitschig
References in classic literature ?
It was Miss Briggs and little Rawdon, whose business it was to see to the inward renovation of Sir Pitt's house, to superintend the female band engaged in stitching the blinds and hangings, to poke and rummage in the drawers and cupboards crammed with the dirty relics and congregated trumperies of a couple of generations of Lady Crawleys, and to take inventories of the china, the glass, and other properties in the closets and store-rooms.
Tatham compares the audience to "Indians, who their native wealth despise, / And dote on stranger's trash and trumperies" The "unhallowed heat" that Whitehall has introduced into England has altered the racial makeup of its citizens.
In any event, a crucial moment occurred when the principal mountebank would come forward, open a trunk filled "with a world of newfangled trumperies" and make a lengthy oration "for almost an hour," according to Coryate, wherein he would "extol the virtue of his drugs and confections" (273).