trumpet vine

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trumpet vine

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

trumpet vine

n
(Plants) either of two bignoniaceous vines, Campsis radicans of the eastern US or C. grandiflora of E Asia, with clumps of trumpet-shaped flowers: grown as ornamentals. Also called: trumpet climber or trumpet flower
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

trum′pet creep`er


n.
1. a climbing vine, Campsis radicans, of the southern U.S., having large, red trumpet-shaped flowers.
2. a related Chinese vine, C. chinensis.
[1825–35, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trumpet vine - a North American woody vine having pinnate leaves and large red trumpet-shaped flowerstrumpet vine - a North American woody vine having pinnate leaves and large red trumpet-shaped flowers
Bignoniaceae, family Bignoniaceae - trees or shrubs or woody vines or herbs having fruit resembling gourds or capsules; sometimes placed in the order Scrophulariales
2.trumpet vine - evergreen North American honeysuckle vine having coral-red or orange flowerstrumpet vine - evergreen North American honeysuckle vine having coral-red or orange flowers
honeysuckle - shrub or vine of the genus Lonicera
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Brightly flowering bougainvillea and scarlet trumpet vines cover many walls.
Along with cedars, arborvitae and honeysuckle trumpet vines, Keating's yard is home to 13 birds of prey.
Ivy, ficus and trumpet vines are self-supporting, meaning they'll attach to just about anything with their runners or claws.
Next came some of my very favorites, the bruised and tattered trumpet vines with no leaves or stems that came home in a lunchbox from preschool, followed by wild onions and a host of other blooms.
In pots of earthenware or tin there will be flowers growing: on trumpet vines flowers of startling blue open at first light, close again in the baking heat of noon, open again if ever the onset of night cools the air.
During that me, several wild trumpet vines, sumac bushes, goldenrod and Queen Anne's lace pushed through the hard clay, stretching to cover the bank.