trundle bed

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Related to trundle beds: IKEA, Daybeds

trundle bed

n.
1. A furniture set consisting of two beds, one of which is on casters and can be rolled underneath the other bed for storage.
2. The bed from this set that can be stored underneath the other.

trundle bed

n
(Furniture) a less common word for truckle bed

trun′dle bed`


n.
a low bed on casters, usu. pushed under another bed when not in use. Also called truckle bed.
[1535–45]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trundle bed - a low bed to be slid under a higher bedtrundle bed - a low bed to be slid under a higher bed
bed - a piece of furniture that provides a place to sleep; "he sat on the edge of the bed"; "the room had only a bed and chair"
Translations

trundle bed

n (US) → Rollbett nt
References in periodicals archive ?
The two models included LaJolla boat beds and Pirates of the Caribbean twin trundle beds.
The house has five bedrooms, but the children seem to prefer the playroom above the three-car garage, containing plenty of trundle beds for bunking after a hard day of play.
The Powell Kids section of Schwartz's new store is devoted to children's bunk beds, trundle beds and day beds, along with some dressers and related items.
Consumer Product Safety Commission and Bayside Furnishings of San Diego, CA, announced a voluntary recall of approximately 9,300 LaJolla Boat beds and Pirates of the Caribbean Twin Trundle beds.
And for spaces so slim they could be termed anorexic, the store carries well-designed versions of trundle beds.
Sofa-sleepers, daybeds, or trundle beds are wonderful options for a guest bedroom, studio, garage apartment, or parent's suite.
14 the Economy Secretariat announced the elimination of some compensatory quotas for products originating from China (footwear, chinaware and ceramic table wares, trundle beds, etc.
Despite her well-detailed manias, such as for the good scotch unavailable in repressive Santa Varvara and for sleeping, coffinlike, in trundle beds, Stephanie Delacour is rarely more than wispy as a character or narrator; that the stories she files are not always those her editor is interested in, is perhaps indicative of a problematic status of narrative itself in fin-de-siecle culture.