tsar


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tsar

 (zär, tsär)
n.
Variant of czar.. See Usage Note at czar.

tsar

(zɑː; tsɑː) or

czar

n
1. (Historical Terms) (until 1917) the emperor of Russia
2. a tyrant; autocrat
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) informal a public official charged with responsibility for dealing with a certain problem or issue: a drugs tsar.
4. informal a person in authority; leader
5. (Historical Terms) (formerly) any of several S Slavonic rulers, such as any of the princes of Serbia in the 14th century
Also (less commonly): tzar
[from Russian tsar, via Gothic kaisar from Latin Caesar]
ˈtsardom, ˈczardom n

czar

or tsar

(zɑr, tsɑr)

n.
1. an emperor or king.
2. (often cap.) the former emperor of Russia.
3. an autocratic ruler or leader.
4. any person exercising great authority or power: a czar of industry.
[1545–55; < Russian tsar', Old Russian tsĭsarĭ emperor, king (akin to Old Church Slavonic tsěsarĭ) < Gothic kaisar emperor (< Greek or Latin); Greek kaîsar < Latin Caesar Caesar]
czar′dom, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tsar - a male monarch or emperor (especially of Russia prior to 1917)tsar - a male monarch or emperor (especially of Russia prior to 1917)
Russia - a former empire in eastern Europe and northern Asia created in the 14th century with Moscow as the capital; powerful in the 17th and 18th centuries under Peter the Great and Catherine the Great when Saint Petersburg was the capital; overthrown by revolution in 1917
crowned head, monarch, sovereign - a nation's ruler or head of state usually by hereditary right

tsar

czar
noun
1. ruler, leader, emperor, sovereign, tyrant, despot, overlord, autocrat Princess Anne is related to the Tsar of Russia.
2. (Informal) head, chief, boss, big cheese (informal), baas (S. African), head honcho (informal) He was appointed 'drugs tsar' by Bill Clinton.
Translations
car
zar
cár
tsar, keisari
caras
cars
cár

tsar

[zɑːʳ] Nzar m

tsar

tzar, czar [ˈzɑːr] n
(formerly, in Russia)tsar m
(person in charge of dealing with problem) drug tsar → haut(e) responsable mf de la lutte contre la drogue
AIDS tsar → haut(e) responsable mf de la lutte contre le sida

tsar

nZar m

tsar

[zɑːʳ] nzar m inv

tsar,

czar,

tzar

(zaː) noun
(the status of) any of the former emperors of Russia. He was crowned tsar; Tsar Nicholas.
References in classic literature ?
The Tsar said something more which Rostov did not hear, and the soldiers, straining their lungs, shouted "Hurrah!"
Stopping in front of the Pavlograds, the Tsar said something in French to the Austrian Emperor and smiled.
The Tsar called the colonel of the regiment and said a few words to him.
The Tsar addressed the officers also: "I thank you all, gentlemen, I thank you with my whole heart." To Rostov every word sounded like a voice from heaven.
Rostov, standing in the front lines of Kutuzov's army which the Tsar approached first, experienced the same feeling as every other man in that army: a feeling of self-forgetfulness, a proud consciousness of might, and a passionate attraction to him who was the cause of this triumph.
Hurrah!" thundered from all sides, one regiment after another greeting the Tsar with the strains of the march, and then "Hurrah!"...
All the cadets were as usual greatly moved, and Kasatsky even shed tears, remembering the past, and vowed that he would serve his beloved Tsar with all his soul.
Apart from his main vocation, which was the service of his Tsar and the fatherland, he always set himself some particular aim, and however unimportant it was, devoted himself completely to it and lived for it until it was accomplished.
She loved him now more than she had loved the Tsar, and apart from the Imperial dignity would not have preferred the Emperor to him.
Had his fiancee's lover been a private person he would have killed him, but it was his beloved Tsar.
From afar at the end of Tsar Peter Straat, issued in the frosty air the tinkle of bells of the horse tramcars, appearing and disappearing in the opening between the buildings, like little toy carriages harnessed with toy horses and played with by people that appeared no bigger than children.
Why, as 'tis, they're saying, 'Your master will be getting some honor from the Tsar for it.' Indeed and it is a strange thing; why need you worry about the peasants?"