tube foot


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tube foot

n.
One of the numerous external, fluid-filled muscular tubes of an echinoderm, such as a starfish or sea urchin, serving as organs of locomotion, food handling, and respiration.

tube foot

n
(Zoology) any of numerous tubular outgrowths of the body wall of most echinoderms that are used as organs of locomotion and respiration and to aid ingestion of food

tube′ foot`


n.
one of numerous small, tubular processes on the ventral body surface of most echinoderms, used for locomotion and grasping.
[1885–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tube foot - tentacular tubular process of most echinoderms (starfish and sea urchins and holothurians) having a sucker at the end and used for e.g. locomotion and respirationtube foot - tentacular tubular process of most echinoderms (starfish and sea urchins and holothurians) having a sucker at the end and used for e.g. locomotion and respiration
echinoderm - marine invertebrates with tube feet and five-part radially symmetrical bodies
invertebrate foot, foot - any of various organs of locomotion or attachment in invertebrates
References in periodicals archive ?
The early nerves include the ring nerve surrounding the future mouth, the radial nerves extending from the ring nerve to the tips of the arms, and the podial nerves extending from the radial nerves to encircle each tube foot (Fig.
Each tube foot consists of an enlarged and flattened distal extremity, the disc, which makes contact and attaches to the substratum, the epidermis of the disc encloses a duo-gland adhesive system comprising two types of cells, the ones releasing adhesive secretions and those releasing de-adhesive secretions, allowing sea urchins to attach themselves to substratum (Santos & Flammang 2007).
Alternatively, because sea urchin tube feet disc photoreceptor cells in vivo connect directly to tube foot nerves (Ullrich-Luter et al., 2011), the miniature currents we observed may represent synaptic vesicular release from sea urchin tube feet disc cells as part of the expected onward signaling from photoreceptor cells to the rest of the sea urchin nervous system.
The NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME increased sea urchin righting time at 1 mmol [l.sup.-1] but had no detectable effect on righting time at 0.2 mmol [l.sup.-1], indicating a role of NO in tube foot motility (Fig.
If tube-foot number (and therefore total area of podial support) varies isometrically with arm length, then the mass supported per tube foot and per unit podial cross-sectional area will be higher in larger sea stars, which might impair locomotion at larger body sizes.
Evaluation of the different forces brought into play during tube foot activities in sea stars.
At the base of the tube foot where the podial NS joined with the radial nerve cords.
Histological sections showed that these tissue layers occupied about 24% and 59%, respectively, of the wall of the ventral tube foot of A.
7b, d), although the fiber plexus in the outer connective tissue of the tentacle appeared to have fewer cells than in the tube foot.
The skeletogenesis of the posterodorsal rod, dorsal arch, disk of tube foot, and spines were observed with differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy and polarizing microscopy (OPTIPHOT-POL, Nikon, Tokyo, Japan).
In the sea star contact experiments, a single tube foot was excised from a live sea star, held in self-closing forceps, and brought into contact with the back of the oral hood of a specimen of Melibe.