tuberculoid


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Related to tuberculoid: lepromatous

tu·ber·cu·loid

 (to͝o-bûr′kyə-loid′, tyo͝o-)
adj.
1. Resembling tuberculosis, as in being characterized by tubercular lesions: tuberculoid leprosy.
2. Resembling a tubercule.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tuberculoid

(tjʊˈbɜːkjʊˌlɔɪd)
adj
in the form of a tubercleof or relating to a type of leprosy with some symptoms similar to tuberculosis
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.tuberculoid - resembling tuberculosis; "tuberculoid lesions"; "tuberculoid leprosy"
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Translations

tuberculoid

adj tuberculoide
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Atrophy and flattening of epidermis, presence of tuberculoid granulomas in the dermis and lower layers of epidermis.
The Ridley-Jopling classification of leprosy divides the disease into five groups: tuberculoid (TT), borderline tuberculoid (BT), mid-borderline (BB), borderline lepromatous (BL), and lepromatous (LL).
marinum in humans were first reported as a tuberculoid infection and associated with swimming pools in Sweden in 1939.
Danielssen and Boeck in 1847 classified leprosy into three main clinical types as shown in (Box 2).1 Same authors in 1848 divided leprosy into nodular and anesthetic (Box 2).2 Hansen and Looft in 1895 divided it into tuberosa and maculoanesthetic types (Box 2).3 But, term nodular and maculoanesthetic were used by Kobner.4 Neisser in 1903 described the disease under three forms (Box 2).5 Darier used the term 'tuberculoid' in relation to leprosy.4
Its clinical spectrum ranges from tuberculoid leprosy through borderline forms to lepromatous leprosy of the Ridley-Jopling classification [4].
Biopsy of a representative lesion was performed and the histological examination revealed the presence of tuberculoid granulomas accompanied by caseation necrosis.
Of these, 13 presented indeterminate leprosy (IL), 15 presented tuberculoid leprosy (TT), and 15 presented lepromatous leprosy (LL).
Histopathological examinations revealed a granulomatous inflammation with giant cells without caseating necrosis, reported as tuberculoid granulomas.
Although rare, given its global prevalence, it is imperative for the clinicians to distinguish the many clinical variants of cutaneous tuberculosis and the masquerading infections--granulomatous syphilis, discoid lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, tuberculoid leprosy, sarcoidosis, actinomycosis, mycetoma, bacterial abscesses, and other skin infections--to preclude missed or delayed diagnosis [2, 3].
Borderline tuberculoid leprosy in a woman from the state of Georgia with armadillo exposure.
The infectious causes are Mycobacterium tuberculosis causing tuberculous granulomas both caseating and non caseating, Mycobacterium leprae causing non caseating lepromatous granulomas both tuberculoid and lepromatous as well as borderline type, Treponema Pallidum causing Gumma in syphilis a microscopic to grossly visible granulomatous lesion composed of sheets of histiocytes, plasma cell and vasculitis.
[2,3] An autoimmune model of tuberculoid leprosy has been developed, using peripheral nerve as antigen.