BCG vaccine

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Related to tuberculosis vaccine: BCG vaccine, tuberculosis test

BCG vaccine

 (bē′sē-jē′)
n.
A preparation consisting of attenuated human tubercle bacilli that is used for immunization against tuberculosis.

[B(acillus) C(almette-)G(uérin) vaccine.]

BCG vaccine


n.
a vaccine made from weakened strains of tubercle bacilli, used to produce immunity against tuberculosis.
[1925–30; B(acillus)C(almette)-G(uérin)]
References in periodicals archive ?
BCG is the only licensed tuberculosis vaccine available globally.
This tuberculosis vaccine is widely used in countries with high TB infection rates.
Prof Peter Beverley, a former senior academic at the university, claims that scientists tested a new tuberculosis vaccine on more than a thousand infants without sharing data suggesting that monkeys given the immunisation had appeared to "die rapidly".
Evaluation of a human BCG challenge model to assess antimycobacterial immunity induced by BCG and a candidate tuberculosis vaccine, MVA85A, alone and in combination.
Since the 1980s, Maurice was associated with the South African Tuberculosis Vaccine Initiative and was instrumental in the establishment of the clinical trial site in Worcester--now the largest in the world--where he mentored many clinicians.
building with Aeras, a nonprofit, global biotech organization developing new tuberculosis vaccines, and is partnering with Aeras on process development and manufacturing of tuberculosis vaccine candidates.
The bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine was adopted by the League of Nations as the standard tuberculosis vaccine in 1928 and continues to be used in most developing countries.
THE tuberculosis vaccine could help prevent multiple sclerosis (MS) in people showing early signs of the disease, research suggests.
This Phase IIb study was sponsored by Aeras and conducted by the University of Cape Town's South African Tuberculosis Vaccine Initiative (SATVI).
Summary: Acontroversial experimental cure for type 1 diabetes, using a tuberculosis vaccine invented a century ago, appears to temporarily vanquish the disease, according to a study in a handful of patients led by a scientist long criticised by her peers.
The third reason for optimism is the huge progress being made in the tuberculosis vaccine field, from which leprosy research can benefit.

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