tubular bell


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tubular bell

n.
1. Any of a set of tuned metal pipes.
2. tubular bells A set of such pipes, used as an orchestral instrument.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
"I enjoy ringing them each week and became very interested in their uniqueness, and wondered if there were anymore tubular bell sets around.
LOOK out for the guy who's playing at Dublin's Point Depot on July 15 - he's a right tubular bell!
She illustrates this well with stories of the unusual tubular bell factory in Clarendon Street, a nail factory in Moor Street, the Albany Social Club, St Barbara's first church, the ribbon weaving shed which became Earlsdon's first school, and the first shop which opened in 1860 as a speculative business venture.
Evidently inspired by a witches' sabbath, it incorporates dramatic changes of pace and volume, finally winding down to a portentous climax with the sonorous chime of a tubular bell.
The two shepherds (oboe and cor anglais) are not magically distanced and the finale's loudly thwacked (and spotlit) tubular bells are without mystery.
THE noise was a cross between a First World War battlefield and Tubular Bells played as heavy metal.
Released in 1973, Tubular Bells was the debut album by whom?
REVIEW Tubular Bells for Two Birmingham Town Hall By Kirsten Rawlins TWO men, 20 instruments and one iconic album: Tubular Bells For Two is a unique display of talent - and a delight to watch.
Mike Oldfield's Tubular Bells has sold more than 15 million copies since its release in 1973, winning a Grammy Award and forming one of the most instantly recognisable soundtracks of all time, writes Kirsten Rawlins.