tufted titmouse


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tufted titmouse

n.
A bluish-gray titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor) of eastern and southern North America, having a crest on its head and brown flanks.

tuft′ed tit′mouse


n.
a gray titmouse, Parus bicolor, of the E and midwestern U.S., having a crested head.
[1825–35, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tufted titmouse - crested titmouse of eastern and midwestern United Statestufted titmouse - crested titmouse of eastern and midwestern United States
titmouse, tit - small insectivorous birds
genus Parus, Parus - type genus of the family Paridae
References in periodicals archive ?
Tufted Titmouse is monotypic (Grubb and Pravasudov, 2008), whereas the Black-crested Titmouse has several weakly marked subspecies (Patten and Smith- Patten, 2008).
This may explain why Black-capped Chickadee, Tufted Titmouse, and White-breasted Nuthatch had the greatest frequency of visits at large, high oil content seeds after adjusting to feeder rotation during the study conducted in conjunction with Trial 3.
Shuttling busily back and forth between bird feeders and trees, where they stash seeds in bark crevices, the jaunty tufted titmouse is more vocal than ever in winter.
Of the several gray birds pictured, only one had her visitor's little crest--the tufted titmouse.
Of these, the Hooded Warbler, absent as a breeding bird in 2003, was 2 standard deviations below its mean, and the Tufted Titmouse was 3 standard deviations below its mean.
The black-capped chickadee and tufted titmouse preferred the hanging feeder, the house sparrow preferred the ground feeder, and the blue jay did not have a preference for location.
Alternatively, frequent prescribed burning, timber harvest, and hardwood reduction may negatively impact some species, including tufted titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor) (9), ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapillus), red-eyed vireo (10), and black-and-white warbler (Mniotilta varia; 5).
Stunning photographs show scenes featuring a Northern Cardinal, slate-colored Dark-eyed Junco, a Red Breasted Nuthatch, Tufted Titmouse, White Breasted Nuthatch, Black-capped Chickadee, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Wild Turkey, and finally, the mystery visitor, a doe deer
The seven species were ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapillus; OVEN), red-eyed vireo (Vireo olivaceus; REVI), hooded warbler (Wilsonia citrina; HOWA), blue-gray gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea; BGGN), tufted titmouse (Baeohrphus bicolor; TUTI), indigo bunting (Passerina cyanea; INBU), and prairie warbler (Dendroica discolor, PRAW), and represented a continuum from mature forest species to early successional species.
Among resident passerines, Tufted Titmouse, Northern Cardinal, American Goldfinch, Brown-headed Cowbird, Eastern Towhee, Carolina Chickadee, White-breasted Nuthatch, Carolina Wren, and American Robin were abundant at all three sites.