tug


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tug

 (tŭg)
v. tugged, tug·ging, tugs
v.tr.
1. To pull at vigorously or repeatedly: tugged the bell rope. See Synonyms at pull.
2. To move by pulling with great effort or exertion; drag: tugged the mattress onto the porch.
3. To tow by tugboat.
v.intr.
To pull something vigorously or repeatedly: tugged at the coat's zipper.
n.
1. An instance of tugging; a strong or sudden pull: gave the leash a tug.
2. A pulling force: the tug of gravity.
3. A contest; a struggle: a tug between loyalty and desire.
4.
a. A tugboat.
b. A land, air, or space vehicle that moves or tows other vehicles: an airplane tug.
5. A rope, chain, or strap used in hauling, especially a harness trace.

[Middle English tuggen, from Old English tēon; see deuk- in Indo-European roots.]

tug′ger n.

tug

(tʌɡ)
vb, tugs, tugging or tugged
1. (when: intr, sometimes foll by at) to pull or drag with sharp or powerful movements: the boy tugged at the door handle.
2. (Nautical Terms) (tr) to tow (a vessel) by means of a tug
3. (intr) to work; toil
n
4. a strong pull or jerk: he gave the rope a tug.
5. (Nautical Terms) Also called: tugboat or towboat a boat with a powerful engine, used for towing barges, ships, etc
6. a hard struggle or fight
7. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) a less common word for trace21
[C13: related to Old English tēon to tow1]
ˈtugger n

tug

(tʌg)

v. tugged, tug•ging,
n. v.t.
1. to pull at with force, vigor, or effort.
2. to move by pulling forcibly; drag; haul.
3. to tow (a vessel) by means of a tugboat.
v.i.
4. to pull with force or effort.
5. to strive hard; labor; toil.
n.
6. an act or instance of tugging; pull.
7. a strenuous contest; struggle.
9. that by which something is tugged, as a rope or chain.
[1175–1225; Middle English toggen to play-wrestle, contend; akin to Old English togian to tow1]
tug′ger, n.

tug


Past participle: tugged
Gerund: tugging

Imperative
tug
tug
Present
I tug
you tug
he/she/it tugs
we tug
you tug
they tug
Preterite
I tugged
you tugged
he/she/it tugged
we tugged
you tugged
they tugged
Present Continuous
I am tugging
you are tugging
he/she/it is tugging
we are tugging
you are tugging
they are tugging
Present Perfect
I have tugged
you have tugged
he/she/it has tugged
we have tugged
you have tugged
they have tugged
Past Continuous
I was tugging
you were tugging
he/she/it was tugging
we were tugging
you were tugging
they were tugging
Past Perfect
I had tugged
you had tugged
he/she/it had tugged
we had tugged
you had tugged
they had tugged
Future
I will tug
you will tug
he/she/it will tug
we will tug
you will tug
they will tug
Future Perfect
I will have tugged
you will have tugged
he/she/it will have tugged
we will have tugged
you will have tugged
they will have tugged
Future Continuous
I will be tugging
you will be tugging
he/she/it will be tugging
we will be tugging
you will be tugging
they will be tugging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been tugging
you have been tugging
he/she/it has been tugging
we have been tugging
you have been tugging
they have been tugging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been tugging
you will have been tugging
he/she/it will have been tugging
we will have been tugging
you will have been tugging
they will have been tugging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been tugging
you had been tugging
he/she/it had been tugging
we had been tugging
you had been tugging
they had been tugging
Conditional
I would tug
you would tug
he/she/it would tug
we would tug
you would tug
they would tug
Past Conditional
I would have tugged
you would have tugged
he/she/it would have tugged
we would have tugged
you would have tugged
they would have tugged

Tug

Instead of a Trace chain running the entire distance from the Hames to Singletree, sometimes a wide, laminated leather strap (tug) was used for most of the distance. Tumbling rod Instead of a belt, power was transmitted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tug - a sudden abrupt pulltug - a sudden abrupt pull      
pull, pulling - the act of pulling; applying force to move something toward or with you; "the pull up the hill had him breathing harder"; "his strenuous pulling strained his back"
2.tug - a powerful small boat designed to pull or push larger shipstug - a powerful small boat designed to pull or push larger ships
boat - a small vessel for travel on water
helm - steering mechanism for a vessel; a mechanical device by which a vessel is steered
Verb1.tug - pull hardtug - pull hard; "The prisoner tugged at the chains"; "This movie tugs at the heart strings"
attract, pull in, draw in, pull, draw - direct toward itself or oneself by means of some psychological power or physical attributes; "Her good looks attract the stares of many men"; "The ad pulled in many potential customers"; "This pianist pulls huge crowds"; "The store owner was happy that the ad drew in many new customers"
2.tug - strive and make an effort to reach a goaltug - strive and make an effort to reach a goal; "She tugged for years to make a decent living"; "We have to push a little to make the deadline!"; "She is driving away at her doctoral thesis"
push, bear on - press, drive, or impel (someone) to action or completion of an action; "He pushed her to finish her doctorate"
strain, strive, reach - to exert much effort or energy; "straining our ears to hear"
struggle, fight - make a strenuous or labored effort; "She struggled for years to survive without welfare"; "He fought for breath"
3.tug - tow (a vessel) with a tugtug - tow (a vessel) with a tug; "The tugboat tugged the freighter into the harbor"
tow - drag behind; "Horses used to tow barges along the canal"
4.tug - carry with difficultytug - carry with difficulty; "You'll have to lug this suitcase"
carry, transport - move while supporting, either in a vehicle or in one's hands or on one's body; "You must carry your camping gear"; "carry the suitcases to the car"; "This train is carrying nuclear waste"; "These pipes carry waste water into the river"
5.tug - move by pulling hardtug - move by pulling hard; "The horse finally tugged the cart out of the mud"
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"
6.tug - pull or strain hard attug - pull or strain hard at; "Each oar was tugged by several men"
draw, pull, force - cause to move by pulling; "draw a wagon"; "pull a sled"
7.tug - struggle in oppositiontug - struggle in opposition; "She tugged and wrestled with her conflicts"
fight, struggle, contend - be engaged in a fight; carry on a fight; "the tribesmen fought each other"; "Siblings are always fighting"; "Militant groups are contending for control of the country"

tug

verb
1. pull, drag, pluck, jerk, yank, wrench, lug A little boy tugged at her sleeve excitedly.
2. drag, pull, haul, tow, lug, heave, draw She tugged him along by his arm.
noun
1. pull, jerk, yank, wrench, drag, haul, tow, traction, heave My head was snapped backwards by a tug on my air hose.

tug

verb
1. To exert force so as to move (something) toward the source of the force:
2. To exert one's mental or physical powers, usually under difficulty and to the point of exhaustion:
noun
A sudden motion, such as a pull:
Translations
زَوْرَق القَطْرشَدَّةٌ قَوِيَّهيَسْحَب، يَجُر
škubnutítrhnoutvlečný člun
hiverykslæbebåd
hinatanykäisynykäys
dráttarbáturrykkurtoga í
trūktelėjimastrūktelėtivilkikasvirvės traukimas
rāviensstrauji vilkt, rautvelkonis
myknúť
potegpotegnitivlačilec
kuvvetle çekme/asılmakuvvetle çekmek/asılmakrömorkör

tug

[tʌg]
A. N
1. (= pull) → tirón m, jalón m (LAm)
to give sth a (good) tugdar a algo un tirón (fuerte)
2. (Naut) (= boat) → remolcador m
B. VT
1. (= pull) → tirar de, jalar (LAm)
to tug sth alongarrastrar algo, llevar algo arrastrándolo
2. (Naut) → remolcar
eventually they tugged the boat clearpor fin sacaron el barco a flote
C. VItirar, jalar (LAm)
to tug at sthtirar de algo
they tugged their hardestse esforzaron muchísimo tirando de él
somebody was tugging at my sleevealguien me tiraba de la manga

tug

[ˈtʌg]
n
(also tug boat) → remorqueur m
(= pull)
I felt a tug at my sleeve → Je sentis qu'on me tirait par la manche.
to give sth a tug → tirer sur qch
Bobby gave her hair a tug
BUT Bobby tira ses cheveux en arrière.
vttirer sur
tug at
vttirer surtug-of-love [ˌtʌgəvˈlʌv] n conflit entre parents divorcés pour avoir la garde d'un enfanttug-of-war [ˌtʌgəvˈwɔːr] n
(lit)tir m à la corde
(fig)lutte f acharnée

tug

vtzerren, ziehen; vessel(ab)schleppen; she tugged his sleevesie zog an seinem Ärmel; she tugged a tuft of his hair out by the rootssie zog or riss ihm ein Büschel Haare aus
viziehen, zerren (→ at an +dat) ? heartstrings
n
(= pull) to give something a tugan etw (dat)ziehen; I felt a tug on my sleeveich spürte, wie mich jemand am Ärmel zog; parting with it was quite a tuges fiel mir etc sehr schwer, mich etc davon zu trennen
(also tugboat)Schlepper m, → Schleppkahn m

tug

:
tug-of-love
nTauziehen um das Kind/die Kinder bei einer Ehescheidung
tug-of-war
n (Sport, fig) → Tauziehen nt

tug

[tʌg]
1. n
a. (pull) → strattone m
to give sth a (good) tug → dare uno strattone a qc
b. (ship) (also tugboat) → rimorchiatore m
2. vt (pull) → tirare con forza
3. vi to tug (at)dare uno strattone (a)

tug

(tag) past tense, past participle tugged verb
to pull (something) sharply and strongly. He tugged (at) the door but it wouldn't open.
noun
1. a strong, sharp pull. He gave the rope a tug.
2. a tug-boat.
ˈtug-boat noun
a small boat with a very powerful engine, for towing larger ships.
ˌtug-of-ˈwar noun
a competition in which two people or teams pull at opposite ends of a rope, trying to pull their opponents over a centre line.

tug

, tugging
n. tirón; estirón;
vt. halar; estirar.
References in classic literature ?
The tug came close beside us, and a man on deck threw us a rope.
A man who had formed one of the long line of passengers, leaning over the rail, watching the tug since it had come into sight, now turned away and walked briskly to the steps leading to the bridge.
Their rescue by the English tug was entirely probable; the capture of the enemy U-33 by the tug's crew was not beyond the range of possibility; and their adventures during the perilous cruise which the treachery and deceit of Benson extended until they found themselves in the waters of the far South Pacific with depleted stores and poisoned water-casks, while bordering upon the fantastic, appeared logical enough as narrated, event by event, in the manuscript.
Those heroes in their harnesses avoid a cannon-ball, And what they know of powder upsets them one and all; Then we come into action and tug the guns again-- Make way there--way for the twenty yoke Of the Forty-Pounder train!
I daresay there are yet a few shipmasters afloat who remember Falk and his tug very well.
Trudolyubov will beat me hardest, he is so strong; Ferfitchkin will be sure to catch hold sideways and tug at my hair.
The horse gave a tug, then another, but failed to clear himself and settled down again as if considering something.
Just then her driver came up, and with a tug at her mouth backed her out of the line and drove off, leaving me very sad indeed.
He closed on the canvas with his teeth and gave a gentle tug.
Here, first of the events, the men were lining up for a tug of war.
The Patriarch, as if he now began to perceive that his part in the piece was to get off the stage as soon as might be, rose, and went to the door by which Pancks had worked out, hailing that Tug by name.
And the first surprise came very soon, when the explosives (to which he owed his sudden chance of engagement)--dynamite in cases and blasting powder in barrels--taken on board, main hatch battened for sea, cook restored to his functions in the galley, anchor fished and the tug ahead, rounding the South Foreland, and with the sun sinking clear and red down the purple vista of the channel, he went on the poop, on duty, it is true, but with time to take the first freer breath in the busy day of departure.