tulipwood


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tu·lip·wood

 (to͞o′lĭp-wo͝od′, tyo͞o′-)
n.
1. The wood of the tulip tree.
2. The irregularly striped, ornamental wood of any of several other trees, especially Dalbergia decipularis of Brazil.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tulipwood

(ˈtjuːlɪpˌwʊd)
n
1. (Forestry) Also called: white poplar or yellow poplar the light soft wood of the tulip tree, used in making furniture and veneer
2. (Forestry) any of several woods having stripes or streaks of colour, esp that of Dalbergia variabilis, a tree of tropical South America
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tu•lip•wood

(ˈtu lɪpˌwʊd, ˈtyu-)

n.
1. the wood of the tulip tree.
2. any of various striped or variegated woods of other trees.
[1835–45]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tulipwood - the variegated or showily striped ornamental wood of various tulipwood treestulipwood - the variegated or showily striped ornamental wood of various tulipwood trees
tulipwood tree - any of various trees yielding variously colored woods similar to true tulipwood
wood - the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
2.tulipwood - light easily worked wood of a tulip treetulipwood - light easily worked wood of a tulip tree; used for furniture and veneer
canary whitewood, Liriodendron tulipifera, tulip poplar, tulip tree, yellow poplar - tall North American deciduous timber tree having large tulip-shaped greenish yellow flowers and conelike fruit; yields soft white woods used especially for cabinet work
wood - the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Firms such as Gillows of Lancaster, founded in 1730, introduced towering, cabinetmade alternatives combining mahogany, satinwood, tulipwood, kingwood, ebony and boxwood.
It measures 9ft 3in (111 cm) wide A superb George III period mahogany, satinwood, tulipwood and kingwood breakfront bookcase attributed to Gillows of Lancaster.
It measures 9ft 3in (111 cm) wide Pictures (c) W R Harvey Antiques Ltd A superb George III period mahogany, satinwood, tulipwood and kingwood breakfront bookcase attributed to Gillows of Lancaster.
Cabinets tulipwood, plywood, and oak; Charlecote kitchen island, all painted in Driftwood, Neptune
His superb Boa-Tea (1996) is an elegant sculpture/teapot fabricated with a jeweller's skill from silver, tulipwood, and ivory.
While the Director was exported globally, Chippendale's furniture business was reliant on imports, including East Asian lacquer and 'exotic' woods like satinwood, rosewood, tulipwood and, of course, mahogany.
The project involved making bespoke painted tulipwood, oak and oak burr cabinets for the kitchen, creating a curved island section to divide the cooking and dining areas and fashioning an oak burr counter top pantry that includes internal spice racks, curved doors and open bookshelves.
* as they watch native stingless bees in the log hive we purchased for the trail and the topknot pigeons (good tucker) in the flowering Tulipwood trees;
Close cousins include the diverse colors of tulipwood, kingwood and cocobolo, all of which were used in the elaborate marquetry decoration of the furniture and joinery of the 18th-century Europe.
These seating installations, which were produced in American tulipwood, red oak, ash and black walnut and also incorporated sustainable fabrics from Warwick Australia, were auctioned off during the night with the proceeds benefiting Surge, a global non-profit organisation that brings life-sustaining water to those most in need, while increasing awareness of the global crisis, said the event organisers.
"One species which is enjoying new interest in the GCC and worldwide is American tulipwood, which is unique to America and which has enormous potential in a very wide range of applications, including in structural use as cross-laminated timber (CLT)."
The American Hardwood Export Council (AHEC), the leading international trade association for the American hardwood industry, highlighted the beauty and versatility of American tulipwood (Liriodendron tulipifera) through the 'Endless Stair' at the London Design Festival 2013 held from September 14 to 22.