tulipwood

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tu·lip·wood

 (to͞o′lĭp-wo͝od′, tyo͞o′-)
n.
1. The wood of the tulip tree.
2. The irregularly striped, ornamental wood of any of several other trees, especially Dalbergia decipularis of Brazil.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tulipwood

(ˈtjuːlɪpˌwʊd)
n
1. (Forestry) Also called: white poplar or yellow poplar the light soft wood of the tulip tree, used in making furniture and veneer
2. (Forestry) any of several woods having stripes or streaks of colour, esp that of Dalbergia variabilis, a tree of tropical South America
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tu•lip•wood

(ˈtu lɪpˌwʊd, ˈtyu-)

n.
1. the wood of the tulip tree.
2. any of various striped or variegated woods of other trees.
[1835–45]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tulipwood - the variegated or showily striped ornamental wood of various tulipwood treestulipwood - the variegated or showily striped ornamental wood of various tulipwood trees
tulipwood tree - any of various trees yielding variously colored woods similar to true tulipwood
wood - the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
2.tulipwood - light easily worked wood of a tulip treetulipwood - light easily worked wood of a tulip tree; used for furniture and veneer
canary whitewood, Liriodendron tulipifera, tulip poplar, tulip tree, yellow poplar - tall North American deciduous timber tree having large tulip-shaped greenish yellow flowers and conelike fruit; yields soft white woods used especially for cabinet work
wood - the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
If wood had a pedigree, Brazilian tulipwood, the colorful member of the Dalbergia (rosewood) genus might be considered best in show.
Like many members of the Dalbergia genus, Brazilian tulipwood has a pleasant scent when the wood is cut.
Close cousins include tulipwood (or pinkwood in the U.S.A.), kingwood, and cocobolo, the diverse colors of which were used in the elaborate marquetry decoration of the furniture and joinery of the 18th Century Europe."