tumble


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tum·ble

 (tŭm′bəl)
v. tum·bled, tum·bling, tum·bles
v.intr.
1. To perform acrobatic feats such as somersaults, rolls, or twists.
2.
a. To fall, roll, or move end over end: The rocks tumbled down the hill. The kittens tumbled over each other. The asteroids tumble through space.
b. To spill, roll out, or emerge in confusion or disorder: Toys tumbled out of the closet.
c. To pitch headlong; fall: tumbled on the ice.
d. To move quickly or awkwardly: We tumbled into the kitchen for lunch.
e. To hang down: Her hair tumbled onto her shoulders.
3.
a. To collapse: The wall tumbled down.
b. To undergo a decline in position, status, or fortune: He tumbled from high office.
c. To decrease: Prices tumbled.
4. To come upon accidentally; happen on: We tumbled on a fine restaurant.
5. Slang To come to a sudden understanding; catch on: tumbled to the reality that he had been cheated.
v.tr.
1. To cause to fall or collapse; bring down: The earthquake tumbled the wall.
2. To put, spill, or toss haphazardly: tumbled the extra parts into a box.
3. To toss or whirl in a drum, tumbler, or tumbling box: The dryer tumbles the clothes.
4. To cause to lose position, status, or fortune: A scandal tumbled the government.
n.
1. An act of tumbling; a fall.
2. A decrease, as in value: Home prices took a tumble.
3. A confused or disordered collection or amount of something: a tumble of shacks by the river.

[Middle English tumblen, frequentative of tumben, to dance about, from Old English tumbian.]

tumble

(ˈtʌmbəl)
vb
1. to fall or cause to fall, esp awkwardly, precipitately, or violently
2. (usually foll by: about) to roll or twist, esp in playing: the kittens tumbled about on the floor.
3. (Gymnastics) (intr) to perform leaps, somersaults, etc
4. to go or move in a heedless or hasty way
5. (Jewellery) (tr) to polish (gemstones) in a tumbler
6. (tr) to disturb, rumple, or toss around: to tumble the bedclothes.
n
7. the act or an instance of tumbling
8. a fall or toss
9. (Gymnastics) an acrobatic feat, esp a somersault
10. a decrease in value, number, etc: stock markets have taken a tumble.
11. a state of confusion
12. a confused heap or pile: a tumble of clothes.
[Old English tumbian, from Old French tomber; related to Old High German tūmōn to turn]

tum•ble

(ˈtʌm bəl)

v. -bled, -bling,
n. v.i.
1. to fall helplessly down, esp. headfirst.
2. to roll end over end, as in falling.
3. to fall or decline rapidly; drop: Prices on the stock exchange tumbled.
4. to perform gymnastic feats of skill, as leaps and somersaults.
5. to fall suddenly from a position of power or authority.
6. to fall in ruins; collapse; topple.
7. to roll about by turning one way and another; pitch about; toss.
8. to stumble or fall (usu. fol. by over).
9. to go, come, get, etc., in a hasty and confused way.
10. Informal. to understand or become aware of some fact or circumstance (often fol. by to).
v.t.
11. to cause to fall or roll end over end.
12. to put in a disordered or rumpled condition; throw or toss about.
13. to cause to fall from power; overthrow; topple.
14. to cause to collapse in ruins.
15. to subject to the action of a tumbling barrel.
n.
16. an act of tumbling or falling.
17. a gymnastic or acrobatic feat.
18. an accidental fall; spill.
19. a drop in value, as of stocks.
20. a fall from a position of power or authority.
21. a response indicating interest, affection, etc.
22. tumbled condition.
[1250–1300; Middle English tum(b)len to dance in acrobatic style, frequentative of tomben, Old English tumbian]

Tumble

 confused pile or mass. See also jumble, tangle.
Examples: tumble of bush and bramble, 1903; of clowns; of feathers, 1755; of rocks and trees, 1762.

tumble


Past participle: tumbled
Gerund: tumbling

Imperative
tumble
tumble
Present
I tumble
you tumble
he/she/it tumbles
we tumble
you tumble
they tumble
Preterite
I tumbled
you tumbled
he/she/it tumbled
we tumbled
you tumbled
they tumbled
Present Continuous
I am tumbling
you are tumbling
he/she/it is tumbling
we are tumbling
you are tumbling
they are tumbling
Present Perfect
I have tumbled
you have tumbled
he/she/it has tumbled
we have tumbled
you have tumbled
they have tumbled
Past Continuous
I was tumbling
you were tumbling
he/she/it was tumbling
we were tumbling
you were tumbling
they were tumbling
Past Perfect
I had tumbled
you had tumbled
he/she/it had tumbled
we had tumbled
you had tumbled
they had tumbled
Future
I will tumble
you will tumble
he/she/it will tumble
we will tumble
you will tumble
they will tumble
Future Perfect
I will have tumbled
you will have tumbled
he/she/it will have tumbled
we will have tumbled
you will have tumbled
they will have tumbled
Future Continuous
I will be tumbling
you will be tumbling
he/she/it will be tumbling
we will be tumbling
you will be tumbling
they will be tumbling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been tumbling
you have been tumbling
he/she/it has been tumbling
we have been tumbling
you have been tumbling
they have been tumbling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been tumbling
you will have been tumbling
he/she/it will have been tumbling
we will have been tumbling
you will have been tumbling
they will have been tumbling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been tumbling
you had been tumbling
he/she/it had been tumbling
we had been tumbling
you had been tumbling
they had been tumbling
Conditional
I would tumble
you would tumble
he/she/it would tumble
we would tumble
you would tumble
they would tumble
Past Conditional
I would have tumbled
you would have tumbled
he/she/it would have tumbled
we would have tumbled
you would have tumbled
they would have tumbled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tumble - an acrobatic feat of rolling or turning end over endtumble - an acrobatic feat of rolling or turning end over end
acrobatic feat, acrobatic stunt - a stunt performed by an acrobat
flip, somersault, somersaulting, summersault, summerset, somerset - an acrobatic feat in which the feet roll over the head (either forward or backward) and return
2.tumble - a sudden drop from an upright positiontumble - a sudden drop from an upright position; "he had a nasty spill on the ice"
pratfall - a fall onto your buttocks
wipeout - a spill in some sport (as a fall from a bicycle or while skiing or being capsized on a surfboard)
trip, slip - an accidental misstep threatening (or causing) a fall; "he blamed his slip on the ice"; "the jolt caused many slips and a few spills"
Verb1.tumble - fall down, as if collapsingtumble - fall down, as if collapsing; "The tower of the World Trade Center tumbled after the plane hit it"
come down, descend, go down, fall - move downward and lower, but not necessarily all the way; "The temperature is going down"; "The barometer is falling"; "The curtain fell on the diva"; "Her hand went up and then fell again"
keel over - turn over and fall; "the man had a heart attack and keeled over"
2.tumble - cause to topple or tumble by pushingtumble - cause to topple or tumble by pushing
push, force - move with force, "He pushed the table into a corner"
3.tumble - roll over and over, back and forthtumble - roll over and over, back and forth  
roll over - make a rolling motion or turn; "The dog rolled over"
4.tumble - fly aroundtumble - fly around; "The clothes tumbled in the dryer"; "rising smoke whirled in the air"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
5.tumble - fall apart; "the building crumbled after the explosion"; "Negotiations broke down"
change integrity - change in physical make-up
6.tumble - throw together in a confused masstumble - throw together in a confused mass; "They tumbled the teams with no apparent pattern"
throw together, jumble, scramble - bring into random order
7.tumble - understand, usually after some initial difficultytumble - understand, usually after some initial difficulty; "She didn't know what her classmates were plotting but finally caught on"
apprehend, comprehend, get the picture, grok, savvy, grasp, compass, dig - get the meaning of something; "Do you comprehend the meaning of this letter?"
8.tumble - fall suddenly and sharplytumble - fall suddenly and sharply; "Prices tumbled after the devaluation of the currency"
drop - go down in value; "Stock prices dropped"
9.tumble - put clothes in a tumbling barrel, where they are whirled about in hot air, usually with the purpose of dryingtumble - put clothes in a tumbling barrel, where they are whirled about in hot air, usually with the purpose of drying; "Wash in warm water and tumble dry"
toss - agitate; "toss the salad"
10.tumble - suffer a sudden downfall, overthrow, or defeattumble - suffer a sudden downfall, overthrow, or defeat
decline, worsen - grow worse; "Conditions in the slum worsened"
11.tumble - do gymnastics, roll and turn skillfullytumble - do gymnastics, roll and turn skillfully
exercise, work out - do physical exercise; "She works out in the gym every day"
roll - execute a roll, in tumbling; "The gymnasts rolled and jumped"

tumble

verb
1. fall, drop, topple, plummet, roll, pitch, toss, stumble, flop, trip up, fall head over heels, fall headlong, fall end over end The dog had tumbled down the cliff.
2. fall steeply or sharply, fall, decline, crash (informal), slide, slump, decrease, plummet, nosedive, take a dive, drop rapidly House prices have tumbled by almost 30 per cent.
3. cascade, fall, flow, pour, stream, spill Waterfalls crash and tumble over rocks.
4. hurry, rush, bound, pile, scramble, scuttle, scurry I love tumbling into my apartment and slamming the door.
5. tousle, ruffle, mess up, rumple, muss (up) (U.S. informal), disarrange, dishevel, make untidy, disorder Her hair was tumbled and her nose scarlet with sunburn.
noun
1. fall, drop, roll, trip, collapse, plunge, spill, toss, stumble, flop, headlong fall He injured his knee in a tumble from his horse.
2. jumble, riot her tumble of golden locks
tumble to something realize, get (informal), see, understand, recognize, take in, perceive, grasp, figure out (informal), comprehend, twig (Brit. informal), get the message (informal), savvy (U.S. informal), apprehend, latch on to (informal), suss (Brit. informal), get the picture (informal), catch on to (informal), cotton on to (informal), get wise to (informal), get your head around (informal) He hasn't yet tumbled to the fact that his wife's cheating on him.

tumble

verb
1. To come to the ground suddenly and involuntarily:
Idiom: take a fall.
2. To undergo a sharp, rapid descent in value or price:
Idiom: take a sudden downtrend.
3. To bring about the downfall of:
phrasal verb
tumble on
To find or meet by chance:
bump into, chance on (or upon), come across, come on (or upon), find, happen on (or upon), light on (or upon), run across, run into, stumble on (or upon).
Archaic: alight on (or upon).
Idiom: meet up with.
noun
1. A sudden involuntary drop to the ground:
Informal: header.
2. A usually swift downward trend, as in prices:
4. A group of things gathered haphazardly:
Translations
سُقوط، تَعَثُّر، إنْقِلاب، تَدَحْرُجيَسْقُط
dělat kotrmelcepádpřemetyspadnout
faldfaldestyrtdykke
dégringolertourbillon transversalculbutedégringolade
akrobatikát végezleesés
fall, byltaveltast; velta um koll
griūtigriuvimasnugriūtiskalbinių džiovintuvasvartytis kūliais
kristkritienskūleņotkulenot, mest kulenusnokrist
padaťprevaľovať sarobiť kotrmelce
prekopicniti sezrušiti se
devrilmekdüşmedüşmekpaldır küldür düşmektepetaklak yuvarlanmak

tumble

[ˈtʌmbl]
A. N (= fall) → caída f; (= somersault) → voltereta f, rodada f (LAm)
to have or take a tumblecaerse
to have a tumble in the hayretozar, hacer el amor (en el pajar)
to take a tumble (fig) → bajar de golpe, dar un bajón
see also rough-and-tumble
B. VI
1. (= fall) → caerse; (= stumble) → tropezar
to tumble downstairs/down a hillrodar por la escalera/por una colina, rodar escaleras abajo/cuesta abajo
to go tumbling over and overir rodando
2. [water] → correr con fuerza (fig) [prices] → caer en picado, desplomarse
3. (= rush) to tumble into/out of bedtirarse en/saltar de la cama
the children tumbled out of the room/carlos niños salieron de la habitación/del coche en tropel
4. (Brit) (= suddenly understand) to tumble to sthcaer en la cuenta de algo
C. VT (= knock down) → derribar, abatir, tumbar (fig) → derrocar; (= upset) → hacer caer; (= disarrange) → desarreglar
D. CPD tumble dryer Nsecadora f
tumble down VI + ADVdesplomarse, venirse abajo

tumble

[ˈtʌmbəl]
n (= fall) → chute f
to have a tumble → faire une chute
to take a tumble [person] → faire une chute; [prices] → dégringoler
(= somersault) → culbute f
vi
(= fall) → tomber
She pushed him and sent him tumbling downstairs → Elle le poussa et le fit tomber dans les escaliers.
The gun tumbled out of his hand → Le pistolet lui tomba des mains.
(= do somersaults) → faire des culbutes
[water] → tomber (en cascade)
(= decrease rapidly) [prices] → dégringoler
tumble down
vi [building, wall] → s'effondrer
tumble to
vt fus (British) (= suddenly realize) → réaliser

tumble

n
(= fall)Sturz m; to take a tumblestürzen, straucheln; (fig)fallen
(= mess)Durcheinander nt
vi
(= fall)straucheln, (hin)fallen; (= move quickly)stürzen; (fig: prices) → fallen; he tumbled off his bicycleer stürzte vom Fahrrad; to tumble out of/into bedaus dem Bett/ins Bett fallen; to tumble over somethingüber etw (acc)fallen or stolpern
(inf: = realize) to tumble to somethingetw kapieren (inf)
(gymnast)Bodenakrobatik machen
vt (= make fall)stoßen; (= make untidy) hairzerzausen, durcheinanderbringen

tumble

:
tumbledown
tumble drier, tumble dryer
nTrockenautomat m, → Heißlufttrockner m, → Trockner m (inf)

tumble

[ˈtʌmbl]
1. n (fall) → ruzzolone m, capitombolo
to have a tumble, take a tumble → fare un ruzzolone or capitombolo
2. vi
a. (fall) → ruzzolare, capitombolare, fare un capitombolo; (somersault) → fare capriole
to tumble downstairs → ruzzolare giù dalle scale
b. (rush) to tumble into/out of bedbuttarsi a/cadere giù dal letto
the children tumbled out of the room/the car → i bambini si sono precipitati fuori dalla stanza/dalla macchina
c. (suddenly understand) to tumble to sth (Brit) (fam) → realizzare qc
3. vtfar cadere
tumble over vi + advruzzolare

tumble

(ˈtambl) verb
1. to (cause to) fall, especially in a helpless or confused way. She tumbled down the stairs; The box suddenly tumbled off the top of the wardrobe.
2. to do tumbling.
noun
a fall. She took a tumble on the stairs.
ˈtumbler noun
1. a large drinking glass. a tumbler of whisky.
2. a tumblerful.
3. an acrobat (who performs the acrobatic tricks on the ground).
ˈtumblerful noun
the amount contained by a tumbler. two tumblerfuls of water.
ˌtumble-ˈdrier noun
a machine for drying clothes by tumbling them around and blowing hot air into them.
ˈtumbling noun
acrobatics done on the ground.
References in classic literature ?
I'm sure Aunt March is a regular Old Man of the Sea to me, but I suppose when I've learned to carry her without complaining, she will tumble off, or get so light that I shan't mind her.
If one of the little Pontellier boys took a tumble whilst at play, he was not apt to rush crying to his mother's arms for comfort; he would more likely pick himself up, wipe the water out of his eves and the sand out of his mouth, and go on playing.
Left by their guide, the travelers remained a few minutes in helpless ignorance, afraid even to move along the broken rocks, lest a false step should precipitate them down some one of the many deep and roaring caverns, into which the water seemed to tumble, on every side of them.
Often, nevertheless, more from caprice than necessity, she demanded to be taken up in arms; but was soon as imperious to he let down again, and frisked onward before Hester the grassy pathway, with many a harmless trip and tumble.
Suppose now, he should tumble in upon me at midnight --how could I tell from what vile hole he had been coming?
Now, a nigger, you see, what's got to be hacked and tumbled round the world, and sold to Tom, and Dick, and the Lord knows who, 'tan't no kindness to be givin' on him notions and expectations, and bringin' on him up too well, for the rough and tumble comes all the harder on him arter.
So we jogged along, and now and then we struck a stretch of dust, and it would tumble up in clouds and get into my nose and make me sneeze and cry; and of course I said things I oughtn't to have said, I don't deny that.
She was, however, only an untrained Yorkshire rustic who had been brought up in a moorland cottage with a swarm of little brothers and sisters who had never dreamed of doing anything but waiting on themselves and on the younger ones who were either babies in arms or just learning to totter about and tumble over things.
First put the frying-pan on the dish, and then tumble both of them over.
My eyes were full, and I felt as if I were going to tumble down.
Wopsle not to tumble on his Roman nose, and to keep up with us.
All round the room big barrels stood against the walls, fastened at the bottom so they wouldn't tumble with the rolling of the ship; and above the barrels, pewter jugs of all sizes hung from wooden pegs.